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U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Hurricane Sandy Recovery

  • One Year Later: HHS Remains Committed

    Hard hit communities benefit from research on long-term health recovery

    t HHS, we recognize that recovering from disasters can take years, so we remain committed to serving these communities just as we did during the initial response to the storm.

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HHS Hurricane Sandy Funding | Mental Health Resources | Mold and Respiratory Issues | Mold Remediation | Lead and Asbestos | Household Hazardous Waste | Mosquitoes and West Nile Virus | Worker Safety | Find Resources in your State

Hurricane Sandy Recovery Activities

Mental Health Resources

When disaster strikes, often people react with increased anxiety, worry and anger. With support from community and family, most of us bounce back. However, some may need extra assistance to cope with unfolding events and uncertainties. If you are experiencing emotional distress due to the storm, call the National Disaster Distress Helpline. This toll-free, multilingual, crisis support service is available 24/7 via telephone (1-800-985-5990) and SMS (text ‘TalkWithUs’ to 66746).


Mold and Respiratory Issues

​Mold Remediation

Lead and Asbestos


Household Hazardous Waste



Mosquitoes and West Nile Virus

Worker Safety

Find Resources in Your State

Recover and Become More Resilient

U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development

  • This page last reviewed: May 04, 2015