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U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Hurricane Sandy - Public Health Situation Updates

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Hurricane Sandy Response and Recovery Activities

December 4, 2012

HHS will continue to provide health and human services assistance as communities in New York and New Jersey recover from Hurricane Sandy.

As hospitals, nursing homes and other healthcare facilities have returned to service and HHS medical support is no longer needed, HHS teams have returned to their home states. Throughout the hurricane response, more than 2,300 healthcare providers from the HHS National Disaster Medical System and U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corps cared for more than 6,700 residents at overwhelmed hospitals and at shelters in New York and New Jersey.

To assist the New York City area emergency management services, 350 ambulances had deployed from other areas of the country to New York under a FEMA contract. All of these ambulances have returned to their home locations.

The Emergency Prescription Assistance Program (EPAP) will remain activated in New York and New Jersey through Dec. 31 to assist people in impacted areas who have no form of health insurance coverage. These residents can use the program to replace certain prescription medications and limited durable medical equipment lost or damaged in the hurricane. So far more than 5,500 uninsured New York residents and approximately 2,500 uninsured New Jersey residents have used the program to replace lost or damaged prescription medication and medical equipment. To learn about the program, visit www.phe.gov/epap.

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) has provided $8.2 million in crisis counseling grants to support disaster behavioral health needs in New York. With these funds, the state plans to hire and train 1,000 workers in 35 service provider organizations. SAMHSA also provided $1.9 million across 4 provider organizations in New Jersey where workers report more than 10,000 encounters primarily at FEMA Disaster Recovery Centers.

As additional support for behavioral health needs during recovery over the holiday season, SAMHSA has increased staff for the National Disaster Distress Helpline. This toll-free, multilingual, crisis support service is available 24/7 via telephone (1-800-985-5990) and SMS (text ‘TalkWithUs’ to 66746).

A National Veterinary Response Team from HHS will provide primary and acute care for pets at a large pet shelter in Brooklyn through Dec. 12. The shelter is being managed by the ASPCA with funding from television personality Rachael Ray. Members of the HHS vet team came from as far as Alaska and Florida to provide veterinary care for the approximately 200 displaced pets at the facility.

A disaster case management team remains deployed by the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) to assist impacted New Jersey residents connect with needed local, state and federal disaster recovery services.

In addition the ACF Office of Child Care will continue to provide technical assistance to agencies in New York and New Jersey to support child care, foster care, and Head Start recovery efforts. To find open child care facilities in New York State, call 800-345-KIDS(5437) and in New Jersey call the Child Care Help Line of New Jersey, 800-332-9227.

Following the Secretary’s declarations of public health emergencies in New York and New Jersey, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services will provide waivers as needed under 1135 of the Social Security Act for healthcare providers in New York and New Jersey.

​​November 26, 2012

Approximately 365 HHS personnel remain deployed to provide public health and medical assistance to New York and New Jersey in Hurricane Sandy recovery efforts, including a disaster case management team deployed by the Administration for Children and Families to assist impacted New Jersey residents connect with needed local, state and federal disaster recovery services.

Another team of specialists from Administration for Children and Families continues supporting child care, foster care, and Head Start recovery efforts in New York and New Jersey. To find open child care facilities in New York State, call 800-345-KIDS(5437) and in New Jersey call the Child Care Help Line of New Jersey, 800-332-9227.

The Administration for Children and Families also is collaborating with the New Jersey Department of Human Services and key agencies including HHS Administration for Community Living’s Area Agencies on Aging regarding resources for seniors in the impacted areas.

For at least the next 30 days, a National Veterinary Response Team from HHS anticipates providing primary and acute care for pets in the hard hit area New York City known as Far Rockaway and at a large pet shelter in Brooklyn. The vet team members are working from a mobile vet clinic in the Far Rockaway area as local veterinary practices repair their offices and become available again in the community. The large pet shelter is being managed by the ASPCA with funding from television personality Rachael Ray. Members of the HHS vet team came from as far as Alaska and Florida to support the New York City community.
 
As hospitals, nursing homes and other healthcare facilities return to service and HHS medical support is no longer needed, HHS teams return to their home states. One Disaster Medical Assistance Team from the National Disaster Medical System with a cache of medical supplies and a team of U.S. Public Health Service commissioned corps officers are currently in New York providing care in two medical shelters at the state’s and city’s request. A team of mental health experts from the U.S. Public Service also remains deployed to assist the HHS teams and community members.
 
To support behavioral health needs during recovery, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration has increased staff for the National Disaster Distress Helpline. This toll-free, multilingual, crisis support service is available 24/7 via telephone (1-800-985-5990) and SMS (text ‘TalkWithUs’ to 66746).

Approximately 25 ambulances remain deployed in the New York City area to assist with emergency management services. These ambulances deployed from other areas of the country under a FEMA contract. At the height of the response, 350 ambulances were deployed in the New York City area.

HHS activated the Emergency Prescription Assistance Program (EPAP) to assist people in impacted areas who have no form of health insurance coverage so that these residents can replace certain prescription medications and limited durable medical equipment lost or damaged in the hurricane. To learn about the program, visit www.phe.gov/epap.

Following the Secretary’s declarations of public health emergencies in New York and New Jersey, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services continues to approve waivers under 1135 of the Social Security Act for healthcare providers in New York and New Jersey.
 
November 20, 2012

 

 

As hospitals, nursing homes and other healthcare facilities return to service and HHS medical support is no longer needed, HHS teams return to their home states. Four Disaster Medical Assistance Teams from the National Disaster Medical System with caches of medical supplies and a team of U.S. Public Health Service commissioned corps officers are currently in New York providing care in medical shelters and augmenting hospital staff the state’s and city’s request.

Tomorrow the medical team providing care in temporary facilities set up in a Long Beach, N.Y., soccer field will begin transitioning care back to the Long Beach Medical Center. The medical center closed due to severe storm damage and the LBMC will use a Mobile Satellite Emergency Department to resume emergency care services for the community. The MSED came from Hackensack University Medical Center and the New Jersey Emergency Medical Services Task Force.

Approximately 500 HHS personnel remain deployed to provide public health and medical assistance to New York and New Jersey in Hurricane Sandy recovery efforts, including a disaster case management team deployed by the Administration for Children and Families to assist impacted New Jersey residents connect with needed local, state and federal disaster recovery services.

A team of specialists from Administration for Children and Families continues supporting child care, foster care, and Head Start recovery efforts in New York and New Jersey. To find open child care facilities in New York State, call 800-345-KIDS(5437) and in New Jersey call the Child Care Help Line of New Jersey, 800-332-9227.

For at least the next 30 days, a National Veterinary Response Team from HHS anticipates providing primary and acute care for pets in the hard hit area New York City known as Far Rockaway and at a large pet shelter in Brooklyn. The vet team members are working from a mobile vet clinic in the Far Rockaway area as local veterinary practices repair their offices and become available again in the community. The large pet shelter is being managed by the ASPCA with funding from television personality Rachel Ray. Members of the HHS vet team came from as far as Alaska and Florida to support the New York City community. 

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration has increased staff for the National Disaster Distress Helpline to help New York and New Jersey residents connect with local crisis counselors during the holiday season. This toll-free, multilingual, crisis support service is available 24/7 via telephone (1-800-985-5990) and SMS (text ‘TalkWithUs’ to 66746).
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration personnel assisted the state of New Jersey in assessing more than 50 retail food establishments, such as restaurants and grocery stores, in two days. These personnel remain available should additional assistance be needed in New Jersey or other states impacted by Hurricane Sandy.
The HHS medical team members are drawn from across the country, including Arizona, Arkansas, Florida, and Maryland. Team members from California, Connecticut, Georgia, Hawaii, Oregon, Massachusetts, Minnesota, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, and Washington State have returned home.
 
 
Approximately 40 ambulances remain deployed in the New York City area to assist with emergency management services. These ambulances deployed from other areas of the country under a FEMA contract. At the height of the response, 350 ambulances were deployed in the New York City area.
 
In addition to requesting HHS medical team support, New York and New Jersey health departments have called on more than 615 medical volunteers available through two HHS sponsored programs: each state’s Emergency System for Advance Registration of Volunteer Health Professionals (ESAR-VHP) and local Medical Reserve Corps (MRC).  ESAR-VHP and MRC are fully integrated programs in New York and New Jersey. These volunteers are assisting in shelters, including general, American Red Cross, and special medical needs shelters; emergency departments; special needs registries, and call centers.
 
HHS activated the Emergency Prescription Assistance Program (EPAP) to assist people in impacted areas who have no form of health insurance coverage so that these residents can replace certain prescription medications and limited durable medical equipment lost or damaged in the hurricane. To learn about EPAP, visit www.phe.gov/epap.
 
Following the Secretary’s declarations of public health emergencies in New York and New Jersey, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services continues to approve waivers under 1135 of the Social Security Act for healthcare providers in New York and New Jersey.
An HHS Incident Response Coordination Team in New York continues to provide command-and-control to HHS teams requested in that state.
 

November 19, 2012

A National Veterinary Response Team of nine veterinarians and veterinary technicians from HHS is providing primary and acute care for pets in the hard hit area New York City known as Far Rockaway and at a large pet shelter in the New York City area. The vet team members are working from a mobile vet clinic in the Far Rockaway area as local veterinary practices repair their offices and become available again in the community. The large pet shelter is being managed by the ASPCA with funding from television personality Rachel Ray. Members of the HHS vet team came from as far as Alaska and Florida to support the New York City community.  

These veterinary personnel are among the more than 450 HHS personnel who remain deployed to provide public health and medical assistance to New York and New Jersey in Hurricane Sandy recovery efforts.

A team of specialists from the Administration for Children and Families continues to support child care, foster care, and Head Start recovery efforts in New York and New Jersey. This support includes developing a plan to provide child care services to families who have lost child care services as a result of storm impacts to child care facilities. To find open child care facilities in New York State, call 800-345-KIDS(5437) and in New Jersey call the Child Care Help Line of New Jersey, 800-332-9227.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration personnel are deployed in New Jersey in assessing local retail food establishments, such as restaurants and grocery stores.

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration has increased staff for the National Disaster Distress Helpline to help New York and New Jersey residents connect with local crisis counselors during the holiday season. This toll-free, multilingual, crisis support service is available 24/7 via telephone (1-800-985-5990) and SMS (text ‘TalkWithUs’ to 66746).

As hospitals, nursing homes and other healthcare facilities return to service and HHS medical support is no longer needed, HHS teams return to their home states. Seven Disaster Medical Assistance Teams from the National Disaster Medical System with caches of medical supplies and a team of U.S. Public Health Service commissioned corps officers are currently in New York providing care in medical shelters and augmenting hospital staff the state’s and city’s request. 

The HHS medical team members are drawn from across the country, including Arizona, Arkansas, Florida, and Maryland. Team members from California, Connecticut, Georgia, Hawaii, Oregon, Massachusetts, Minnesota, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, and Washington State have returned home.

Approximately 40 ambulances remain deployed in the New York City area to assist with emergency management services. These ambulances deployed from other areas of the country under a FEMA contract. At the height of the response, 350 ambulances were deployed in the New York City area.

At Shinnecock Tribe's request, the HHS Indian Health Service deployed an engineer from its New York office to help assess clinic structural damage as well as water, sewer and other environmental safety items.

In addition to requesting HHS medical team support, New York and New Jersey health departments have called on more than 615 medical volunteers available through two HHS sponsored programs: each state’s Emergency System for Advance Registration of Volunteer Health Professionals (ESAR-VHP) and local Medical Reserve Corps (MRC).  ESAR-VHP and MRC are fully integrated programs in New York and New Jersey. These volunteers are assisting in shelters, including general, American Red Cross, and special medical needs shelters; emergency departments; special needs registries, and call centers.

HHS activated the Emergency Prescription Assistance Program (EPAP) to assist people in the impacted areas without any form of health insurance coverage to replace certain prescription medications and limited durable medical equipment lost or damaged in the hurricane. To learn about EPAP, visit www.phe.gov/epap.

Following the Secretary’s declarations of public health emergencies in New York and New Jersey, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services continues to approve waivers under 1135 of the Social Security Act for healthcare providers in New York and New Jersey.

An HHS Incident Response Coordination Team in New York continues to provide command-and-control to HHS teams requested in that state.

November 16, 2012

A National Veterinary Response Team of nine veterinarians and veterinary technicians from HHS today began providing primary and acute care for pets in the hard hit area New York City known as Far Rockaway and at a large pet shelter in the New York City area. The vet team members are working from a mobile vet clinic in the New York City area as local veterinary practices repair their offices and become available again in the community. The large pet shelter is being managed by the ASPCA with funding from television personality Rachel Ray. Members of the HHS vet team came from as far as Alaska and Florida to support the New York City community.  

These veterinary personnel are among the approximately 680 HHS personnel who remain deployed to provide public health and medical assistance to New York and New Jersey in Hurricane Sandy recovery efforts.

In addition, a team of specialists from the Administration for Children and Families is supporting child care, foster care, and Head Start recovery efforts in New York and New Jersey. This support includes developing a plan to provide child care services to families who have lost child care services as a result of storm impacts to child care facilities.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration personnel are deployed in New Jersey assisting state and local inspectors in assessing food and drug manufacturing facilities and retail food establishments.

At Shinnecock Tribe's request, the HHS Indian Health Service deployed an engineer from its New York office to help assess clinic structural damage as well as water, sewer and other environmental safety items.

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration has increased staff for the National Disaster Distress Helpline to help New York and New Jersey residents connect with local crisis counselors during the holiday season. This toll-free, multilingual, crisis support service is available 24/7 via telephone (1-800-985-5990) and SMS (text ‘TalkWithUs’ to 66746). 

As hospitals, nursing homes and other healthcare facilities return to service, HHS teams return to their home states. Seven Disaster Medical Assistance Teams from the National Disaster Medical System with caches of medical supplies and a team of U.S. Public Health Service commissioned corps officers are currently in New York providing care in medical shelters and augmenting hospital staff the state’s and city’s request. 

The HHS medical team members are drawn from across the country, including Arizona, Florida Georgia, Hawaii, and Maryland. Team members from Arkansas, California, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Minnesota, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, and Washington State have returned home.

Approximately 140 ambulances remain deployed in the New York City area to assist with emergency management services. These ambulances deployed from other areas of the country under a FEMA contract. At the height of the response, 350 ambulances were deployed in the New York City area.

In addition to requesting HHS medical team support, New York and New Jersey health departments have called on more than 615 medical volunteers available through two HHS sponsored programs: each state’s Emergency System for Advance Registration of Volunteer Health Professionals (ESAR-VHP) and local Medical Reserve Corps (MRC).  ESAR-VHP and MRC are fully integrated programs in New York and New Jersey. These volunteers are assisting in shelters, including general, American Red Cross, and special medical needs shelters; emergency departments; special needs registries, and call centers.

HHS activated the Emergency Prescription Assistance Program (EPAP) to assist people in the impacted areas without any form of health insurance coverage to replace certain prescription medications and limited durable medical equipment lost or damaged in the hurricane. To learn about EPAP, visit www.phe.gov/epap.

Following the Secretary’s declarations of public health emergencies in New York and New Jersey, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services continues to approve waivers under 1135 of the Social Security Act for healthcare providers in New York and New Jersey.

An HHS Incident Response Coordination Team in New York continues to provide command-and-control to HHS teams requested in that state.  ASPR Regional Emergency Coordinators and liaisons from the Administration for Children and Families remain deployed to the Regional Response Coordination Center.

November 15, 2012

HHS has deployed a National Veterinary Response Team of nine veterinarians and veterinary technicians to provide primary and acute care for pets in the hard hit area New York City known as Far Rockaway and at a large pet shelter in the New York City area. The vet team members will work from a mobile vet clinic in Far Rockaway as local veterinary practices repair their offices and become available again in the community. The large pet shelter will be managed by the ASPCA, representing one of the first times HHS has partnered with a non-profit organization to provide pet care after a disaster. Members of the HHS vet team came from as far as Alaska and Florida to support the New York City community.  

These veterinary personnel are among the approximately 840 HHS personnel who remain deployed to provide public health and medical assistance to New York and New Jersey in Hurricane Sandy recovery efforts. 

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration is increasing staffing of the National Disaster Distress Helpline to help New York and New Jersey residents connect with local crisis counselors during the holiday season. This toll-free, multilingual, crisis support service is available 24/7 via telephone (1-800-985-5990) and SMS (text ‘TalkWithUs’ to 66746). 

As hospitals, nursing homes and other healthcare facilities return to service, HHS teams return to their home states. Seven Disaster Medical Assistance Teams from the National Disaster Medical System with caches of medical supplies and a team of U.S. Public Health Service commissioned corps officers are currently deployed to New York to provide care in medical shelters and augment hospital staff the states’ and city’s request. 

The HHS medical team members are drawn from across the country, including Arizona, Arkansas, Florida Georgia, Hawaii, and Maryland. Team members from California, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Minnesota, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, and Washington State have returned home.

Approximately 240 ambulances remain deployed in the New York City area to assist with emergency management services. These ambulances deployed from other areas of the country under a FEMA contract. At the height of the response, 350 ambulances were deployed in the New York City area.

In addition to requesting HHS medical team support, New York and New Jersey health departments have called on more than 615 medical volunteers available through two HHS sponsored programs: each state’s Emergency System for Advance Registration of Volunteer Health Professionals (ESAR-VHP) and local Medical Reserve Corps (MRC).  ESAR-VHP and MRC are fully integrated programs in New York and New Jersey. These volunteers are assisting in shelters, including general, American Red Cross, and special medical needs shelters; emergency departments; special needs registries, and call centers.

HHS activated the Emergency Prescription Assistance Program (EPAP) to assist people in the impacted areas without any form of health insurance coverage to replace certain prescription medications and limited durable medical equipment lost or damaged in the hurricane. To learn about EPAP, visit www.phe.gov/epap.

In addition, a team of specialists from the Administration for Children and Families continues to support child care, foster care, and Head Start recovery efforts in New York and New Jersey, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration personnel are available to assist the states of New York and New Jersey in assessing FDA-regulated industries.

Following the Secretary’s declarations of public health emergencies in New York and New Jersey, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services continues to approve waivers under 1135 of the Social Security Act for healthcare providers in New York and New Jersey.

An HHS Incident Response Coordination Team in New York continues to provide command-and-control to HHS teams requested in that state.  ASPR Regional Emergency Coordinators and liaisons from the Administration for Children and Families remain deployed to the Regional Response Coordination Centers. Regional Emergency Coordinators also are serving as liaisons for FEMA incident management assistance teams.

November 14, 2012

Approximately 800 HHS personnel remain deployed to provide public health and medical assistance to New York and New Jersey in Hurricane Sandy response and recovery efforts. 

As the National Guard continues going door-to-door to assist stranded residents in two of the hardest hit areas around New York City, members of HHS medical teams are available to provide immediate, basic medical care for the residents in need. 

As hospitals, nursing homes and other healthcare facilities return to service, HHS teams return to their home states. Nine Disaster Medical Assistance Teams from the National Disaster Medical System with caches of medical supplies and two teams of U.S. Public Health Service commissioned corps officers are currently deployed to New York and New Jersey to provide care in medical shelters and augment hospital staff the states’ and city’s request. 

These teams include behavioral health professionals from the U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corps deployed to provide mental health support in shelters and for first responders. Residents also can connect with local crisis counselors through the National Disaster Distress Helpline. This toll-free, multilingual, crisis support service is available 24/7 via telephone (1-800-985-5990) and SMS (text ‘TalkWithUs’ to 66746). 

The HHS medical team members are drawn from across the country, including Arizona, Arkansas, Florida Georgia, Hawaii, Maryland, and Oklahoma. Team members from California, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Minnesota, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, and Washington State have returned home.

Approximately 240 ambulances remain deployed in the New York City area to assist with emergency management services. These ambulances deployed from other areas of the country under a FEMA contract. At the height of the response, 350 ambulances were deployed in the New York City area.

In addition to requesting HHS medical team support, New York and New Jersey health departments have called on more than 615 medical volunteers available through two HHS sponsored programs: each state’s Emergency System for Advance Registration of Volunteer Health Professionals (ESAR-VHP) and local Medical Reserve Corps (MRC).  ESAR-VHP and MRC are fully integrated programs in New York and New Jersey. These volunteers are assisting in shelters, including general, American Red Cross, and special medical needs shelters; emergency departments; special needs registries, and call centers.

At the request of the State of New Jersey, a Federal Medical Station continues to serve as a medical shelter at Middlesex Community College in Edison, New Jersey. At the request of the state of New York, equipment from a Federal Medical Station is also in use in a New York City hospital. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention deployed equipment for seven Federal Medical Stations for use if needed in New Jersey and New York. Medical personnel from the U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corps are providing medical care for residents at these FMS locations.

HHS activated the Emergency Prescription Assistance Program (EPAP) to assist people in the impacted areas without any form of health insurance coverage to replace certain prescription medications and limited durable medical equipment lost or damaged in the hurricane. To learn about EPAP, visit www.phe.gov/epap.

In addition, a team of specialists from the Administration for Children and Families continues to support child care, foster care, and Head Start recovery efforts in New York and New Jersey, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration personnel are available to assist the states of New York and New Jersey in assessing FDA-regulated industries.

Following the Secretary’s declarations of public health emergencies in New York and New Jersey, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services continues to approve waivers under 1135 of the Social Security Act for healthcare providers in New York and New Jersey.

An HHS Incident Response Coordination Team in New York and New Jersey continues to provide command-and-control to HHS teams requested in that state.  ASPR Regional Emergency Coordinators and liaisons from the Administration for Children and Families remain deployed to the Regional Response Coordination Centers. Regional Emergency Coordinators also are serving as liaisons for FEMA incident management assistance teams.

November 13, 2012

Approximately 1,000 HHS personnel remain deployed to provide public health and medical assistance to New York and New Jersey in Hurricane Sandy response and recovery efforts. 

As the National Guard continues going door-to-door to assist stranded residents in two of the hardest hit areas around New York City, members of HHS medical teams are available to provide immediate, basic medical care for the residents in need. 

As hospitals, nursing homes and other healthcare facilities return to service, HHS teams return to their home states. Nine Disaster Medical Assistance Teams from the National Disaster Medical System with caches of medical supplies and two teams of U.S. Public Health Service commissioned corps officers remain deployed to New York and New Jersey to provide care in medical shelters and augment hospital staff the states’ and city’s request. 

These teams include behavioral health professionals from the U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corps deployed to provide mental health support in shelters and for first responders. Residents also can connect with local crisis counselors through the National Disaster Distress Helpline. This toll-free, multilingual, crisis support service is available 24/7 via telephone (1-800-985-5990) and SMS (text ‘TalkWithUs’ to 66746). 

The HHS medical team members are drawn from across the country, including California, Texas, South Carolina, Ohio, Maryland Georgia, and Florida. Teams from Connecticut, Massachusetts, Minnesota, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Tennessee, Virginia, and Washington State are returning home.

In addition to requesting HHS medical team support, New York and New Jersey health departments have called on more than 615 medical volunteers available through two HHS sponsored programs: each state’s Emergency System for Advance Registration of Volunteer Health Professionals (ESAR-VHP) and local Medical Reserve Corps (MRC).  ESAR-VHP and MRC are fully integrated programs in New York and New Jersey. These volunteers are assisting in shelters, including general, American Red Cross, and special medical needs shelters; emergency departments; special needs registries, and call centers.

At the request of the State of New Jersey, a Federal Medical Station continues to serve as a medical shelter at Middlesex Community College in Edison, New Jersey. At the request of the state of New York, equipment from a Federal Medical Station is also in use in a New York City hospital. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention deployed equipment for seven Federal Medical Stations for use if needed in New Jersey and New York. Medical personnel from the U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corps and the National Disaster Medical System are providing medical care for residents at these FMS locations.

HHS activated the Emergency Prescription Assistance Program (EPAP) to assist people in the impacted areas without any form of health insurance coverage to replace certain prescription medications and limited durable medical equipment lost or damaged in the hurricane. To learn about EPAP, visit www.phe.gov/epap.

In addition, a team of specialists from the Administration for Children and Families continues to support child care, foster care, and Head Start recovery efforts in New York and New Jersey, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration personnel are available to assist the states of New York and New Jersey in assessing FDA-regulated industries.


Following the Secretary’s declarations of public health emergencies in New York and New Jersey, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services continues to approve waivers under 1135 of the Social Security Act for healthcare providers in New York and New Jersey.


An HHS Incident Response Coordination Team in New York and New Jersey continues to provide command-and-control to HHS teams requested in that state.  ASPR Regional Emergency Coordinators and liaisons from the Administration for Children and Families remain deployed to the Regional Response Coordination Centers. Regional Emergency Coordinators also are serving as liaisons for FEMA incident management assistance teams. 

November 12, 2012

More than 1,000 HHS personnel remain deployed to provide public health and medical assistance to New York and New Jersey in Hurricane Sandy response and recovery efforts.

As the National Guard goes door-to-door to assist stranded residents in two of the hardest hit areas around New York City, members of HHS medical teams are available to provide immediate, basic medical care for the residents in need.

As hospitals, nursing homes and other healthcare facilities return to service, HHS teams return to their home states. HHS medical personnel Nine Disaster Medical Assistance Teams from the National Disaster Medical System with caches of medical supplies and two teams of U.S. Public Health Service commissioned corps officers remain deployed to New York and New Jersey to provide care in medical shelters and augment hospital staff the states’ and city’s request.

These teams include behavioral health professionals from the U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corps deployed to provide mental health support in shelters and for first responders. Residents also can connect with local crisis counselors through the National Disaster Distress Helpline. This toll-free, multilingual, crisis support service is available 24/7 via telephone (1-800-985-5990) and SMS (text ‘TalkWithUs’ to 66746).

The HHS medical team members are drawn from across the country, including Minnesota, California, Texas, South Carolina, Ohio, Maryland Georgia, and Florida. Teams from Connecticut, Massachusetts, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Tennessee, Virginia, and Washington State are returning home.

In addition to requesting HHS medical team support, New York and New Jersey health departments have called on more than 615 medical volunteers available through two HHS sponsored programs: each state’s Emergency System for Advance Registration of Volunteer Health Professionals (ESAR-VHP) and local Medical Reserve Corps (MRC). ESAR-VHP and MRC are fully integrated programs in New York and New Jersey. These volunteers are assisting in shelters, including general, American Red Cross, and special medical needs shelters; emergency departments; special needs registries, and call centers.

At the request of the State of New Jersey, a Federal Medical Station continues to serve as a medical shelter at Middlesex Community College in Edison, New Jersey. At the request of the state of New York, equipment from a Federal Medical Station is also in use in a New York City hospital. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention deployed equipment for seven Federal Medical Stations for use if needed in New Jersey and New York. Medical personnel from the U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corps and the National Disaster Medical System are providing medical care for residents at these FMS locations.

HHS activated the Emergency Prescription Assistance Program (EPAP) to assist people in the impacted areas without any form of health insurance coverage to replace certain prescription medications and limited durable medical equipment lost or damaged in the hurricane. To learn about EPAP, visit www.phe.gov/epap.

In addition, a team of specialists from the Administration for Children and Families continues to support child care, foster care, and Head Start recovery efforts in New York and New Jersey, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration personnel are available to assist the states of New York and New Jersey in assessing FDA-regulated industries.

Following the Secretary’s declarations of public health emergencies in New York and New Jersey, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services continues to approve waivers under 1135 of the Social Security Act for healthcare providers in New York and New Jersey.

An HHS Incident Response Coordination Team in New York and New Jersey continues to provide command-and-control to HHS teams requested in that state. ASPR Regional Emergency Coordinators and liaisons from the Administration for Children and Families remain deployed to the Regional Response Coordination Centers. Regional Emergency Coordinators also are serving as liaisons for FEMA incident management assistance teams.

November 10, 2012

To support the local healthcare community, more than 1,100 HHS personnel are deployed to provide public health and medical assistance to New York and New Jersey in Hurricane Sandy response and recovery efforts.

As hospitals, nursing homes and other healthcare facilities return to service, HHS teams will begin returning to their home states. Disaster Medical Assistance Teams from the National Disaster Medical System with caches of medical supplies and teams of U.S. Public Health Service commissioned corps officers remain deployed to New York and New Jersey to provide care in medical shelters and augment hospital staff at the states’ and city’s request.

These personnel include behavioral health professionals from the U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corps supporting shelter operations. Nearly 60 officers from three mental health teams have assisted approximately 700 residents and first responders a day, helping address basic mental health issues and facilitating environmental interventions to increase people’s resilience in difficult circumstances. Residents can connect with local crisis counselors through the National Disaster Distress Helpline. This toll-free, multilingual, crisis support service is available 24/7 via telephone (1-800-985-5990) and SMS (text ‘TalkWithUs’ to 66746).

HHS medical teams are drawn from across the country. Teams deployed for the Hurricane Sandy response are from Rhode Island, Washington State, Minnesota, Massachusetts, North Carolina, California, Texas, Connecticut, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Ohio, Virginia, Georgia, Tennessee, and Florida.

In addition to requesting HHS medical team support, New York and New Jersey health departments have called on more than 615 medical professionals available through two HHS sponsored programs: their state Emergency System for Advance Registration of Volunteer Health Professionals (ESAR-VHP) and local Medical Reserve Corps (MRC). ESAR-VHP and MRC are fully integrated programs in New York and New Jersey. These volunteers are assisting in shelters, including general, American Red Cross, and special medical needs shelters; emergency departments; special needs registries, and call centers.

At the request of the State of New Jersey, a Federal Medical Station continues to serve as a medical shelter at Middlesex Community College in Edison, New Jersey. This Federal Medical Station was one of seven deployed from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to the area to be available if needed in New Jersey or New York. Medical personnel from the U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corps and the National Disaster Medical System are providing medical care for residents at the FMS.

HHS activated the Emergency Prescription Assistance Program (EPAP) to assist people in the impacted areas without any form of health insurance coverage to replace certain prescription medications and limited durable medical equipment lost or damaged in the hurricane. To learn about EPAP, visit www.phe.gov/epap.

In addition, a team of specialists from the Administration for Children and Families is supporting child care, foster care, and Head Start recovery efforts in New York and New Jersey.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration personnel are available to assist the states of New York and New Jersey in assessing FDA-regulated industries. Following the Secretary’s declarations of public health emergencies in New York and New Jersey, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services continues to approve waivers under 1135 of the Social Security Act for healthcare providers in New York and New Jersey.

An HHS Incident Response Coordination Team in New York and New Jersey continues to provide command-and-control to HHS teams requested in that state. ASPR Regional Emergency Coordinators and liaisons from the Administration for Children and Families remain deployed to the Regional Response Coordination Centers. Regional Emergency Coordinators also are serving as liaisons for FEMA incident management assistance teams.

​​November 9, 2012

Throughout the response, New York and New Jersey health departments have called on more than 615 medical professionals available through two HHS sponsored programs: their state Emergency System for Advance Registration of Volunteer Health Professionals (ESAR-VHP) and local Medical Reserve Corps (MRC).  ESAR-VHP and MRC are fully integrated programs in New York and New Jersey. These volunteers are assisting in shelters, including general, American Red Cross, and special medical needs shelters; emergency departments; special needs registries, and call centers. 

To support the local healthcare community, more than 1,100 HHS personnel are deployed to provide public health and medical assistance to New York and New Jersey in Hurricane Sandy response and recovery efforts. These personnel include behavioral health professionals from the U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corps supporting shelter operations. Nearly 60 officers from three Mental Health Teams have assisted approximately 700 residents and first responders a day, helping address basic mental health issues and facilitating environmental interventions in shelters such as ensuring that lights were off or low in a shelter at a sufficient time for people to sleep, arranging structured activities for children and adults, limiting access to sugary/caffeinated items by children after supper so that they are better able to sleep. These types of basic issues are increase people’s resilience in difficult circumstances. 

As hospitals, nursing homes and other healthcare facilities return to normal service, HHS teams will return to their home states. Currently 15 Disaster Medical Assistance Teams from the National Disaster Medical System with caches of medical supplies and two teams of U.S. Public Health Service commissioned corps officers are deployed to New York and New Jersey to provide care in medical shelters and augment hospital staff the states’ and city’s request. 

The HHS medical teams are drawn from across the country, including Rhode Island, Washington State, Minnesota, Massachusetts, North Carolina, California, Texas, Connecticut, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Ohio, Virginia, Georgia, Tennessee, and Florida. The Tennessee team and one Pennsylvania team are preparing to return home today.

At the request of the State of New Jersey, HHS established a Federal Medical Station to serve as a medical shelter in Middlesex, New Jersey. This Federal Medical Station was one of seven deployed from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to the area to be available if needed in New Jersey or New York. Medical personnel from the U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corps and the National Disaster Medical System are providing medical care for residents at the FMS.

HHS activated the Emergency Prescription Assistance Program (EPAP) to assist people in the impacted areas without any form of health insurance coverage to replace certain prescription medications and limited durable medical equipment lost or damaged in the hurricane. To learn about EPAP, visit www.phe.gov/epap.

In addition, a team of specialists from the Administration for Children and Families is supporting child care, foster care, and Head Start recovery efforts in New York and New Jersey.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration personnel are available to assist the states of New York and New Jersey in assessing FDA-regulated industries.

Following the Secretary’s declarations of public health emergencies in New York and New Jersey, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services continues to approve waivers under 1135 of the Social Security Act for healthcare providers in New York and New Jersey.

An HHS Incident Response Coordination Team in New York and New Jersey continues to provide command-and-control to HHS teams requested in that state.  ASPR Regional Emergency Coordinators and liaisons from the Administration for Children and Families remain deployed to the Regional Response Coordination Centers. Regional Emergency Coordinators also are serving as liaisons for FEMA incident management assistance teams.

November 8, 2012
 

To assist displaced residents with stress and coping after the storm, HHS has deployed more than 50 mental health officers from the U.S. Public Health Service to shelters in New York and New Jersey at the request of the states. These mental health professionals are making sure shelter residents, patients and local, state and federal responders are connected with mental health resources they may need, including the Disaster Distress HelpLine. The helpline has counselors available by phone (1-800-985-5990) and SMS (text ‘TalkWithUs’ to 66746) 24 hours a day to provide support and referrals to local mental health resources.

The disaster mental health teams are among the more than 1,100 HHS personnel deployed to provide public health and medical assistance to New York and New Jersey in Hurricane Sandy response and recovery efforts.

As hospitals, nursing homes and other healthcare facilities return to normal service, HHS teams will prepare to return to their home states. Fifteen Disaster Medical Assistance Teams from the National Disaster Medical System with caches of medical supplies and two teams of U.S. Public Health Service commissioned corps officers are deployed to New York and New Jersey to provide care in medical shelters and augment hospital staff the states’ and city’s request.

The HHS medical teams are drawn from across the country, including Rhode Island, Washington State, Minnesota, Massachusetts, North Carolina, California, Texas, Connecticut, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Ohio, Virginia, Tennessee, and Florida.

HHS activated the Emergency Prescription Assistance Program (EPAP) to assist people in the impacted areas without any form of health insurance coverage to replace certain prescription medications and limited durable medical equipment lost or damaged in the hurricane. To learn about EPAP, visit www.phe.gov/epap.

At the request of the State of New Jersey, the CDC Federal Medical Station remains in Edison, New Jersey as a medical shelter. Medical personnel from the U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corps and the National Disaster Medical System are providing medical care for residents at the FMS.

In addition, a team of specialists from the Administration for Children and Families continues to support child care and Head Start recovery efforts in New York and New Jersey.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration personnel are available to the states of New York and New Jersey in assessing FDA-regulated industries.

Following the Secretary’s declarations of public health emergencies in New York and New Jersey, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services continues to approve waivers under 1135 of the Social Security Act for healthcare providers in New York and New Jersey.

 

Four liaisons and 350 ambulances remain deployed to New York, made available through the FEMA national ambulance contract.
An HHS Incident Response Coordination Team in New York and New Jersey continues to provide command-and-control to HHS teams requested in that state.  ASPR Regional Emergency Coordinators and liaisons from the Administration for Children and Families remain deployed to the Regional Response Coordination Centers. Regional Emergency Coordinators also are serving as liaisons for FEMA incident management assistance teams. 

 
 
November 7, 2012
 

HHS has activated the Emergency Prescription Assistance Program (EPAP) to assist people in the impacted areas without any form of health insurance coverage to replace certain prescription medications and limited durable medical equipment lost or damaged in the hurricane. People eligible for EPAP are not covered by health insurance, Medicare, Medicaid or the Children’s Health Insurance Program. Eligible people bring their new prescription from a licensed health care practitioner, a current prescription bottle, or other proof of the prescription or limited durable medical equipment to a pharmacy for generic replacements. Pharmacies are reimbursed by the federal government in partnership with the affected state.

More than 1,200 HHS personnel are deployed to provide public health and medical assistance to New York and New Jersey in Hurricane Sandy response and recovery efforts.

Currently 15 Disaster Medical Assistance Teams from the National Disaster Medical System with caches of medical supplies and two teams of U.S. Public Health Service commissioned corps officers are deployed to New York and New Jersey to provide care in medical shelters and augment hospital staff the states’ and city’s request. These teams are available for as long as needed by the healthcare systems in New York and New Jersey. As hospitals, nursing homes and other healthcare facilities return to normal service, HHS teams will prepare to return to their home states.

The HHS medical teams are drawn from across the country, including Rhode Island, Washington State, Minnesota, Massachusetts, North Carolina, California, Texas, Connecticut, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Ohio, Virginia, Tennessee, and Florida.

At the request of the State of New Jersey, the CDC Federal Medical Station remains in Edison, New Jersey as a medical shelter. Medical personnel from the U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corps and the National Disaster Medical System are providing medical care for residents at the FMS.

In addition, a team of specialists from the Administration for Children and Families continues to support child care and Head Start recovery efforts in New York and New Jersey.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration personnel are assisting the states of New York and New Jersey in assessing FDA-regulated industries.

Two HHS teams of mental health experts are integrated with the HHS medical teams and available to support community mental health needs.

Following the Secretary’s declarations of public health emergencies in New York and New Jersey, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services continues to approve waivers under 1135 of the Social Security Act for healthcare providers in New York and New Jersey.

Four liaisons and 350 ambulances remain deployed to New York, made available through the FEMA national ambulance contract.

An HHS Incident Response Coordination Team in New York and New Jersey continues to provide command-and-control to HHS teams requested in that state.  ASPR Regional Emergency Coordinators and liaisons from the Administration for Children and Families remain deployed to the Regional Response Coordination Centers. Regional Emergency Coordinators also are serving as liaisons for FEMA incident management assistance teams.

 
November 6, 2012

More than 1,000 HHS personnel are deployed to provide public health and medical assistance to New York and New Jersey in Hurricane Sandy response and recovery efforts.

Fifteen Disaster Medical Assistance Teams from the National Disaster Medical System with caches of medical supplies and two teams of U.S. Public Health Service commissioned corps officers are deployed to New York and New Jersey to provide care in medical shelters and augment hospital staff the states’ and city’s request.

The HHS medical teams are drawn from across the country, including Rhode Island, Washington State, Minnesota, Massachusetts, North Carolina, California, Texas, Connecticut, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Ohio, Virginia, Tennessee, and Florida. Additional teams are available if needed in New York or New Jersey.

At the request of the State of New Jersey, HHS also established a Federal Medical Station to serve as a medical shelter in Middlesex, New Jersey. This Federal Medical Station was one of seven deployed from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to the area to be available if needed in New Jersey or New York. Medical personnel from the U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corps and the National Disaster Medical System are providing medical care for residents at the FMS.

In addition, a team of specialists from the Administration for Children and Families is supporting child care and Head Start recovery efforts in New York and New Jersey.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration personnel are assisting the states of New York and New Jersey in assessing FDA-regulated industries.

Following the Secretary’s declarations of public health emergencies in New York and New Jersey, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services continues to approve waivers under 1135 of the Social Security Act for healthcare providers in New York and New Jersey.

Four liaisons and 350 ambulances remain deployed to New York, made available through the FEMA national ambulance contract.

Two HHS teams of mental health experts are integrated with the HHS medical teams and available to support community mental health needs.

An HHS Incident Response Coordination Team in New York and New Jersey continues to provide command-and-control to HHS teams requested in that state.  ASPR Regional Emergency Coordinators and liaisons from the Administration for Children and Families remain deployed to the Regional Response Coordination Centers. Regional Emergency Coordinators also are serving as liaisons for FEMA incident management assistance teams.

November 5, 2012:  Situation Overview
 

More than 1,000 HHS personnel are deployed to provide public health and medical assistance to New York and New Jersey in Hurricane Sandy response and recovery efforts.

At the request of the State of New Jersey, HHS yesterday established a Federal Medical Station to serve as a medical shelter in Middlesex, New Jersey. This Federal Medical Station was one of seven deployed to the area to be available if needed in New Jersey or New York. Medical teams from the U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corps and the National Disaster Medical System are providing medical caring for residents at the FMS.

Fifteen Disaster Medical Assistance Teams from the National Disaster Medical System with caches of medical supplies and two teams of U.S. Public Health Service commissioned corps officers are deployed to New York and New Jersey to provide care in medical shelters and augment hospital staff the states’ and city’s request.

The HHS medical teams are drawn from across the country, including Rhode Island, Washington State, Minnesota, Massachusetts, North Carolina, California, Texas, Connecticut, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Ohio, Virginia, Tennessee, and Florida. Additional teams are available if needed in New York or New Jersey.

In addition, a team of specialists from the Administration for Children and Families is supporting child care and Head Start recovery efforts in New York and New Jersey.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration personnel will assist the states of New York and New Jersey in assessing FDA-regulated industries.

Following the Secretary’s declarations of public health emergencies in New York and New Jersey, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services continue to approve waivers under 1135 of the Social Security Act for healthcare providers in New York and New Jersey.

Four liaisons and 350 ambulances remain deployed to New York, made available through the FEMA national ambulance contract.

An HHS team of mental health experts is integrated with the HHS medical teams, and an HHS Incident Response Coordination Team in New York and New Jersey continues to provide command-and-control to HHS teams requested in that state.

ASPR Regional Emergency Coordinators and liaisons from the Administration for Children and Families remain deployed to the Regional Response Coordination Centers. Regional Emergency Coordinators also are serving as liaisons for FEMA incident management assistance teams.

 
November 4, 2012:  Situation Overview

 

More than 850 HHS personnel are deployed to provide public health and medical assistance to New York and New Jersey in Hurricane Sandy response and recovery efforts.

At the request of the State of New Jersey, CDC has established a Federal Medical Station to serve as a medical shelter in Middlesex, New Jersey. This Federal Medical Station was one of seven deployed to the area to be available if needed in New Jersey or New York. This Federal Medical Station in Middlesex will be staffed by  medical providers from the U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corps and the National Disaster Medical System.

Fourteen Disaster Medical Assistance Teams from the National Disaster Medical System with caches of medical supplies and two teams of U.S. Public Health Service commissioned corps officers are deployed to New York and New Jersey. Eleven DMATs and a team of Public Health Service Commissioned Corps team are providing care in medical shelters and augmenting hospital staff in the New York at the state’s and city’s request. Four Disaster Medical Assistance Teams a team of Public Health Service Commissioned Corps team are providing medical care in shelters in New Jersey at the state’s request.

The HHS medical teams are drawn from across the country, including Rhode Island, Washington State, Minnesota, Massachusetts, North Carolina, California, Texas, Connecticut, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Ohio, Virginia, Tennessee, and Florida. Additional teams are available if needed in New York or New Jersey.

In addition, the Administration for Children and Families is deploying a team of specialists to support child care and Head Start recovery efforts in New York City.

Following the Secretary’s declarations of public health emergencies in New York and New Jersey, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has begun approving waivers under 1135 of the Social Security Act for healthcare providers in NY and NJ, as well as 5 individual waivers. Additional waiver requests have been received and are pending. The CMS New York office remains closed with non-essential employees on Administrative Leave due to building damage and power outages.

Four liaisons and 350 ambulances remain deployed to New York, made available through the FEMA national ambulance contract.

An HHS team of mental health experts is integrated with the HHS medical teams, and an HHS Incident Response Coordination Team in New York and New Jersey continues to provide command-and-control to HHS teams requested in that state.

ASPR Regional Emergency Coordinators and liaisons from the Administration for Children and Families remain deployed to the Regional Response Coordination Centers. Regional Emergency Coordinators also are serving as liaisons for FEMA incident management assistance teams.

November 3, 2012: Situation Overview:

Approximately 735 HHS personnel are deployed to provide public health and medical assistance to New York and New Jersey in Hurricane Sandy response and recovery efforts.

Thirteen Disaster Medical Assistance Teams with caches of medical supplies and a team of U.S. Public Health Service commissioned corps officers are deployed to New York and New Jersey. Ten DMATs and the commissioned corps team are providing care in medical shelters and augmenting hospital staff in the New York City area at the state’s and city’s request. Three Disaster Medical Assistance Teams continue to provide medical care in a general population shelter in New Jersey at the state’s request.

The HHS medical teams are drawn from across the country, including Rhode Island, Washington State, Minnesota, Massachusetts, North Carolina, California, Texas, Connecticut, Pennsylvania, Virginia, Tennessee, Ohio, South Carolina, and Florida. Additional teams are available if needed in New York or New Jersey.

CDC has deployed equipment for seven Federal Medical Stations should these resources be needed in New Jersey or New York as the states begin recovering from Hurricane Sandy.

Four liaisons and 350 ambulances remain deployed to New York and 35 additional ambulances are staged in New Jersey, ready to provide support in either state. All of the ambulances were made available through the FEMA national ambulance contract.

An HHS team of mental health experts will be integrated with the HHS medical teams, and an HHS Incident Response Coordination Team in each state is providing command-and-control to HHS teams requested in that state.

ASPR Regional Emergency Coordinators and liaisons from the Administration for Children and Families remain deployed to the Regional Response Coordination Centers. Regional Emergency Coordinators also are serving as liaisons for FEMA incident management assistance teams.

This week Secretary of Health and Human Services Kathleen Sebelius declared public health emergencies for New Jersey and New York, including New York City. For more information on these declarations and the flexibility they provide visit http://www.cms.gov/Emergency/02_Hurricanes.asp.

November 2, 2012: Situation Overview:

The Secretary of Health and Human Services Kathleen Sebelius declared a public health emergency for the entire state of New Jersey yesterday. With the declaration, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services can provide waivers under Section 1135 of the Social Security Act so healthcare providers can continue to provide services to beneficiaries of Medicare, Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program during the severe storms and floods affecting the state. Providers and States should contact their CMS Regional Office for information or refer to the CMS website at www.cms.gov.

More than 700 HHS personnel are deployed to provide public health and medical assistance to New York and New Jersey in the states’ Hurricane Sandy response and recovery efforts.

Approximately 80 beds from a Federal Medical Station were set up overnight in one wing of the Brookdale University Hospital in Brooklyn to accommodate a surge of patients at the hospital. Healthcare providers from a Disaster Medical Assistance Team out of Texas augmented hospital staff in providing care for the surge of patients.

At the request of the state of New York and New York City, 12 Disaster Medical Assistance Teams with caches of medical supplies and a team of U.S. Public Health Service commissioned corps officers continue to provide care in medical shelters in the New York City area. These medical professionals are drawn from across the country, including Rhode Island, Washington State, Minnesota, Massachusetts, North Carolina, California, Texas, Connecticut, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and Florida. Additional teams are available if needed.

A 50-person Disaster Medical Assistance Team from Tennessee continues to provide medical care in a general population shelter in New Jersey at the state’s request, and additional teams are available to the state if needed.

Five liaisons, two pharmacists, and 350 ambulances remain deployed to New York and 35 additional ambulances are staged in New Jersey, ready to provide support in either state. All of the ambulances were made available through the FEMA national ambulance contract.

An Incident Response Coordination Team continues to provide command-and-control to all HHS teams requested in affected states.

ASPR Regional Emergency Coordinators and liaisons from the Administration for Children and Families remain deployed to the Regional Response Coordination Centers in Regions 1, 2, and 3. Regional Emergency Coordinators also are serving as public health and medical services liaisons for FEMA incident management assistance teams in Regions 1 and 3.

Applied public health teams from the U.S. Public Health Service are prepared to support state health agencies if requested by impacted states.

The Administration for Children and Families is working with ACF-supported human services programs in affected states as they assist residents in impacted areas.


November 1, 2012: Situation Overview:

The Secretary of Health and Human Services Kathleen Sebelius declared a public health emergency for the entire state of New York, including New York City, yesterday. With the declaration, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services can provide waivers under Section 1135 of the Social Security Act so healthcare providers can continue to provide services to beneficiaries of Medicare, Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program during this emergency. Providers and states should contact the CMS Regional Office for information or refer to the CMS website at www.cms.gov.

More than 650 HHS personnel are deployed to provide public health and medical assistance to New York and New Jersey in Superstorm Sandy response and recovery efforts.

Ten Disaster Medical Assistance Teams with caches of medical supplies and a team of U.S. Public Health Service commissioned corps officers are providing care in medical shelters in the New York City area. These medical professionals are drawn from across the country, including Rhode Island, Washington State, Minnesota, Massachusetts, North Carolina, Washington State, California, Texas, Connecticut, and Florida. Additional teams are available if needed.

A 50-person Disaster Medical Assistance Team from Tennessee continues to provide medical care in a general population shelter in New Jersey, and additional teams are available to the state if needed.

Five liaisons, two pharmacists, and 350 ambulances remain deployed to New York and 35 additional ambulances are staged in New Jersey, ready to provide support in either state. All of the ambulances were made available through the FEMA national ambulance contract.

An Incident Response Coordination Team is providing command-and-control to all HHS teams requested in affected states.

ASPR Regional Emergency Coordinators and liaisons from the Administration for Children and Families remain deployed to the Regional Response Coordination Centers in Regions 1, 2, and 3. Regional Emergency Coordinators also are serving as public health and medical services liaisons for FEMA incident management assistance teams in Regions 1 and 3.

Applied public health teams from the U.S. Public Health Service are prepared to support state health agencies if requested by impacted states.

The Administration for Children and Families is working with ACF-supported human services programs in affected states as they assist residents in impacted areas.

Tips:
When disaster strikes, often people react with increased anxiety, worry and anger. With support from community and family, most of us bounce back. However, some may need extra assistance to cope with unfolding events and uncertainties. If you are experiencing emotional distress due to the storm, call the National Disaster Distress Helpline. This toll-free, multilingual, crisis support service is available 24/7 via telephone (1-800-985-5990) and SMS (text ‘TalkWithUs’ to 66746).

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention continues offers a text messaging service for disaster health tips. Text SANDY to 87000 to receive Hurricane Sandy health guidance from CDC.

 

October 31, 2012: Situation Overview:

More than 500 HHS personnel are deployed to provide public health and medical assistance to states impacted by Hurricane Sandy.

Disaster Medical Assistance Teams and caches of medical supplies will begin providing care in medical shelters in the New York City area today. These teams of medical professionals come from Minnesota, Massachusetts, North Carolina, Washington State, California, Texas, Connecticut and Florida. A 50-person Disaster Medical Assistance Team from Tennessee continues to provide medical care in general population shelters in New Jersey. Additional teams are available if needed.

Caches of medical equipment and supplies are poised to deploy to affected states if needed.

Five liaisons and two pharmacists remain deployed to New York to support 350 ambulances made available through the FEMA national ambulance contract.

An Incident Response Coordination Team is providing command-and-control to all HHS teams requested in affected states.

ASPR Regional Emergency Coordinators and liaisons from the Administration for Children and Families remain deployed to the Regional Response Coordination Centers in Regions 1, 2, and 3. Regional Emergency Coordinators also are serving as public health and medical services liaisons for FEMA incident management assistance teams in Regions 1 and 3.

Applied public health teams from the U.S. Public Health Service are prepared to support state health agencies if requested by impacted states.

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services remains prepared to provide waivers under Section 1135 of the Social Security Act if needed by affected states so healthcare providers can continue to provide services to beneficiaries of Medicare, Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program during the severe storms and floods affecting the state. Providers and States should contact their CMS Regional Office for information or refer to the CMS website at www.cms.gov.

The Administration for Children and Families is working with ACF-supported human services programs in affected states to assist wherever possible.

October 30, 2012: Situation Overview:

More than 175 HHS personnel are deployed to provide public health and medical assistance to states impacted by Hurricane Sandy.

Three 50-person Disaster Medical Assistance Teams and caches of medical supplies are deployed to provide medical care in general population shelters in New Jersey and are available should other needs arise. These medical providers will help ensure the shelter can meet the needs of residents seeking refuge there. Residents who are require greater medical care can be transported to medical shelters or hospitals. The DMATs draw on medical professionals from across Tennessee and North Carolina, from the Orlando, Florida, area, and will joined by personnel from Minnesota as well.

Medical teams from Connecticut, Rhode Island, and Massachusetts are poised to provide additional assistance if needed in impacted states, and medical teams from California, Texas and Washington State, Florida, Pennsylvania, and Virginia are on alert.

Five liaisons and two pharmacists are deployed to New York to support 350 ambulances made available through the FEMA national ambulance contract.

An Incident Response Coordination Team is providing command-and-control to all HHS teams requested in affected states.

ASPR Regional Emergency Coordinators remain deployed to the Regional Response Coordination Centers in Regions 1, 2, and 3 and to Regions 1 and 3 to serve as public health and medical services liaisons for FEMA incident management assistance teams.

Federal medical stations and additional caches of medical equipment and supplies are poised to deploy to affected states if needed.

Applied public health teams from the U.S. Public Health Service are prepared to support state health agencies if requested by impacted states.

CMS remains prepared to provide waivers under Section 1135 of the Social Security Act if needed by affected states so healthcare providers can continue to provide services to beneficiaries of Medicare, Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program during the severe storms and floods affecting the state. Providers and States should contact their CMS Regional Office for information or refer to the CMS website at www.cms.gov.

The Administration for Children and Families is maintaining situational awareness on the status of ACF-supported human services programs in affected states.

HHS is encouraging employees in the potentially impacted regions to take steps to prepare at home to protect health and safety during and after the storm.

Need health tips in the disaster?  Text SANDY to 87000 to receive Hurricane Sandy health guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 

When disaster strikes, often people react with increased anxiety, worry and anger. With support from community and family, most of us bounce back. However, some may need extra assistance to cope with unfolding events and uncertainties. If you are experiencing emotional distress due to the storm, call the National Disaster Distress Helpline. This toll-free, multilingual, crisis support service is available 24/7 via telephone (1-800-985-5990) and SMS (text ‘TalkWithUs’ to 66746).

October 29, 2012: Situation Overview:

HHS agencies have personnel and medical supplies at the ready to support health and human services needs in communities along the East Coast that may be impacted by Hurricane Sandy. More than 160 personnel are deployed, either pre-staged or in position as part of the state and federal preparedness efforts.

A 50-person Disaster Medical Assistance Team is deployed to provide triage and basic care in two general population shelters in New Jersey, one in Piscataway and the other in Monmouth. These medical providers will help ensure the shelter can meet the needs of residents seeking refuge there. Residents who are require greater medical care can be transported to medical shelters or hospitals. The DMAT, called Tennessee-1 or TN-1, draws personnel from across Tennessee. An additional Disaster Medical Assistance Team called FL-6 from the Orlando, Florida, area remains pre-staged in the mid-Atlantic, prepared to deploy quickly along the East Coast if needed.

An Incident Response Coordination Team is pre-staged to provide command-and-control to all HHS teams requested in affected states.

ASPR Regional Emergency Coordinators are deployed to the Regional Response Coordination Centers in Regions 1, 2, and 3 and are deployed to Regions 1 and 3 to serve as public health and medical services liaisons for FEMA incident management assistance teams.

Federal medical stations and caches of medical equipment and supplies are poised to affected states quickly after the storm and can be deployed north or south, depending on the storm’s impact.

Applied public health teams from the U.S. Public Health Service are prepared to support state health agencies if needed after the storm.

Two liaisons and a pharmacist are deployed in New Jersey, providing support for ambulances made available to impacted states through the FEMA national ambulance contract. To be ready in advance of state requests, FEMA deployed 165 ambulances to New Jersey for use wherever they are needed in the mid-Atlantic.

CMS is prepared to provide waivers under Section 1135 of the Social Security Act if needed by affected states so healthcare providers can continue to provide services to beneficiaries of Medicare, Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program during the severe storms and floods affecting the state. Providers and States should contact their CMS Regional Office for information or refer to the CMS website at www.cms.gov.

The Administration for Children and Families is maintaining situational awareness on the status of ACF-supported human services programs in affected states.

Every disaster holds the potential to impact health so HHS encourages residents to take precautions.

  • Know who you can count on, who’s counting on you and how to reach family and friends during and after the storm. The bReddi Facebook app and the American Red Cross hurricane mobile app can help you make those connections.
  • Check on your neighbor and find out who may need assistance in your neighborhood. See if they need help, such as cleaning leaves out of gutters so gutters can handle the rain or taking other steps to be ready or if they may need help after the storm.
  • Have non-perishable food and bottled water on hand.
  • If you take medications regularly, have an extra supply on hand.
  • If you use a medical device that requires electricity, know where to go if your electricity goes out. If you take medication that requires refrigeration, have a way to keep it cold in a power outage.

When disaster strikes, often people react with increased anxiety, worry and anger. With support from community and family, most of us bounce back. However, some may need extra assistance to cope with unfolding events and uncertainties. If you are experiencing emotional distress due to the storm, call the National Disaster Distress Helpline. This toll-free, multilingual, crisis support service is available 24/7 via telephone (1-800-985-5990) and SMS (text ‘TalkWithUs’ to 66746).

HHS also is encouraging employees in the potentially impacted regions to take steps to prepare at home to protect health and safety during and after the storm.

October 28, 2012: Situation Overview:

HHS agencies have personnel and medical supplies at the ready to support health and human services needs in communities along the East Coast that may be impacted by Hurricane Sandy.

Every disaster holds the potential to impact health so HHS encourages residents to take precautions.

  • Know who you can count on, who’s counting on you and how to reach family and friends during and after the storm. The bReddi Facebook app and the American Red Cross hurricane mobile app can help you make those connections.
  • Check on your neighbor and find out who may need assistance in your neighborhood. See if they need help, such as cleaning leaves out of gutters so gutters can handle the rain or taking other steps to be ready or if they may need help after the storm.
  • Have non-perishable food and bottled water on hand.
  • If you take medications regularly, have an extra supply on hand.
  • If you use a medical device that requires electricity, know where to go if your electricity goes out. If you take medication that requires refrigeration, have a way to keep it cold in a power outage.

When disaster strikes, often people react with increased anxiety, worry and anger. With support from community and family, most of us bounce back. However, some may need extra assistance to cope with unfolding events and uncertainties. If you are experiencing emotional distress due to the storm, call the National Disaster Distress Helpline. This toll-free, multilingual, crisis support service is available 24/7 via telephone (1-800-985-5990) and SMS (text ‘TalkWithUs’ to 66746).

HHS also is encouraging employees in the potentially impacted regions to take steps to prepare at home to protect health and safety during and after the storm.

ASPR Regional Emergency Coordinators are deployed to the Regional Response Coordination Centers in Regions 1, 2, and 3 and are deployed to Regions 1 and 3 to serve as public health and medical services liaisons for FEMA incident management assistance teams.

An Incident Response Coordination Team is pre-staged to provide command-and-control to all HHS teams requested in affected states. Two 50-person Disaster Medical Assistance Teams are pre-staged in the mid-Atlantic, prepared to deploy quickly along the East Coast if needed. One team, called FL-6, is from the Orlando, Florida, area and the other, known as TN-1, draws on medical personnel from across Tennessee. 

Federal medical stations and caches of medical equipment and supplies are poised to affected states quickly after the storm and can be deployed north or south, depending on the storm’s impact.

Applied public health teams from the U.S. Public Health Service are prepared to support state health agencies if needed after the storm.

Two liaisons and a pharmacist are pre-staged in New Jersey to provide support for the FEMA national ambulance contract should states request ambulances through the contract. To be ready in advance of state requests, FEMA deployed 165 ambulances to New Jersey.

CMS is prepared to provide waivers under Section 1135 of the Social Security Act if needed by affected states so healthcare providers can continue to provide services to beneficiaries of Medicare, Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program during the severe storms and floods affecting the state. Providers and States should contact their CMS Regional Office for information or refer to the CMS website at www.cms.gov.

The Administration for Children and Families is maintaining situational awareness on the status of ACF-supported human services programs in affected states.

October 27, 2012: Situation Overview:

HHS agencies continue to lean forward to support health and human services needs in communities along the East Coast that may be impacted by Hurricane Sandy. Personnel and medical supplies stand at the ready.

Every disaster holds the potential to impact health so HHS is encouraging residents to take precautions.

  • Know who you can count on and who is counting on you. Check out bReddi as a way to make the connections.
  • Check on your neighbors and find out may need assistance in your neighborhood. Check to see if they need help, such as cleaning leaves out of gutters so gutters can handle the rain or taking other steps to be ready.
  • Have a plan to contact family and friends after the storm, and have non-perishable food and bottled water on hand.
  • If you take medications regularly, have an extra supply on hand.
  • If you use a medical device that requires electricity, know where to go if your electricity goes out. If you take medication that requires refrigeration, have a way to keep it cold in a power outage.


When disaster strikes, often people react with increased anxiety, worry and anger. With support from community and family, most of us bounce back. However, some may need extra assistance to cope with unfolding events and uncertainties. If you are experiencing emotional distress due to the storm, call the National Disaster Distress Helpline. This toll-free, multilingual, crisis support service is available 24/7 via telephone (1-800-985-5990) and SMS (text ‘TalkWithUs’ to 66746).

ASPR Regional Emergency Coordinators are deployed to the Regional Response Coordination Centers in Regions 1, 2, and 3 and are deployed to Regions 1 and 3 to serve as public health and medical services liaisons for FEMA incident management assistance teams.

An Incident Response Coordination Team is pre-staged to provide command-and-control to all HHS teams requested in affected states. Two 50-person Disaster Medical Assistance Teams are pre-staged in the mid-Atlantic, prepared to deploy quickly along the East Coast if needed. One team is from the Orlando, Florida, area (known as FL-6) and the other draws on medical personnel from across Tennessee (known as TN-1).

Federal medical stations and caches of medical equipment and supplies are poised to affected states quickly after the storm and can be deployed north or south, depending on the storm’s impact.

Applied public health teams from the U.S. Public Health Service are prepared to support state health agencies if needed after the storm.

Two liaisons and a pharmacist are being pre-staged in New Jersey to provide support should for the FEMA national ambulance contract should states request ambulances through the contract.

CMS is prepared to provide waivers under Section 1135 of the Social Security Act if needed by affected states so healthcare providers can continue to provide services to beneficiaries of Medicare, Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program during the severe storms and floods affecting the state. Providers and States should contact their CMS Regional Office for information or refer to the CMS website at www.cms.gov.

The Administration for Children and Families is maintaining situational awareness on the status of ACF-supported human services programs in affected states.

October 26, 2012: Situation Overview:

HHS agencies are leaning forward to support health and human services needs in communities along the East Coast that may be impacted by Hurricane Sandy. Personnel and medical supplies are on alert and at the ready.

Every disaster holds the potential to impact health so HHS encourages residents to take precautions.

  • Know who may need assistance in your neighborhood and check to see if they need help, such as cleaning leaves out of gutters so gutters can handle the rain or taking other steps to be ready;
  • Have a plan to contact family and friends after the storm, and have non-perishable food and bottled water on hand.
  • If you take medications regularly, have a supply on hand.
  • If you use a medical device that requires electricity, know where to go if your electricity goes out. If you take medication that requires refrigeration, have a way to keep it cold in a power outage.

When disaster strikes, often people react with increased anxiety, worry and anger. With support from community and family, most of us bounce back. However, some may need extra assistance to cope with unfolding events and uncertainties. If you are experiencing emotional distress due to the storm, call the National Disaster Distress Helpline. This toll-free, multilingual, crisis support service is available 24/7 via telephone (1-800-985-5990) and SMS (text ‘TalkWithUs’ to 66746).

To be prepared to assist states quickly after the event, ASPR Regional Emergency Coordinators have deployed to Regions 1 and 3 will serve as public health and medical services liaisons for FEMA incident management assistance teams. These teams embed with state emergency operations centers during disaster response. Medical teams from ASPR’s National Disaster Medical Response teams and applied public health teams from the U.S. Public Health Service are on alert to support state health agencies and local health care facilities if needed after the storm.

Federal medical stations and caches of medical equipment and supplies are poised to affected states quickly after the storm and can be deployed north or south, depending on the storm’s impact.

HHS agency websites for hurricane preparedness, response and recovery material are continually updated and include personal tips to keep yourself and your family healthy before, during and after a natural disaster along with links to Ready.gov and other state and federal partners. All HHS public health preparedness, response and recovery information is available through a one-stop website, www.phe.gov and www.phe.gov/situationroom.

  • This page last reviewed: December 04, 2012