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U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Haiti Earthquake 2010

The Public Health Response is for this event is now in the Recovery Phase.  Please visit our partner organizations for futher updates.

HHS Public Health Response Situation Update Summary

February 19, 2010:

  • The HHS medical teams have reported seeing more than 30,700 patients so far, including approximately 285 yesterday, Feb. 18.
  • Since they began seeing patients Jan 17, HHS medical teams have performed 161 surgeries and delivered 40 babies.
  • HHS currently has approximately 132 people deployed in Haiti to support relief efforts.
    • The International Medical Surgical Response Team continues to provide patient care using temporary medical stations set up near a GHESKIO clinic in Port-au-Prince.
    • The teams report seeing patients with chronic disease or who need basic care not necessarily due to the earthquake, an indication that the medical need is returning to routine care rather than emergency care.
  • The U.S. government is working to recover, identify and repatriate the remains of U.S. citizens who perished in the earthquake.
    • A specially trained HHS Family Assistance Center (FAC) Team is working with the U.S. Dept of State and families of U.S. citizens to gather information that will help identify the remains of Americans who died in the earthquake so they can be returned to their families.
    • HHS has provided a disaster portable morgue unit at the Port-au-Prince airport, staffed with mortuary and forensic specialists who will work with the U.S. Dept. of State and U.S. Dept. of Defense to identify remains of U.S. citizens who died in the earthquake.
  • CDC is collaborating with national and international partners to meet urgent public health needs and establishing liaisons and coordination needed for successful, long range public health programs in response to the earthquake.
    • CDC experts participated on Initial Rapid Assessment (IRA) teams that collected health, food, water, nutrition, and sanitation data from 224 sites across Haiti. The IRA has been completed, and CDC staff members in Haiti and Atlanta are assisting with data analysis from the IRAs. These data will be released by the U.N. and used to develop and prioritize immediate interventions.
    • CDC is collaborating with international partners to conduct needs assessments as the basis for the development of long range public health programs in Haiti. CDC staff members are assisting with surveillance of health conditions being diagnosed and treated in health facilities in Haiti. Data on communicable diseases is being collected from over 50 sites. CDC staff are working with Haitian health officials and international partners to analyze the data. Results of the surveillance are being used to prioritize public health interventions, project resources needed by health care facilities as they care for patients, and assist in long-range planning for the reconstruction of the country's health care system.
  • HHS has activated two Federal Coordinating Centers (FCCs) in Atlanta and Tampa as part of the National Disaster Medical System. These two centers are staffed by teams from the Department of Veterans Affairs who will meet NDMS medical evacuation flights from Haiti and arrange ground transport to place patients at appropriate hospitals. Federal Coordinating Centers in New York, NY; Lyons, NJ; Philadelphia, PA; Washington, DC; and Boston, MA are put on alert in case additional capacity is needed to treat patients from Haiti who have life-threatening conditions. Additional information can be found by clicking here.
  • Approximately 27,199 American citizens have returned to the U.S. from Haiti as of midnight Feb. 19. Of these, approximately 7,770 received Administration for Children and Families (ACF)-funded services assistance, such as medical attention, food, short-term lodging, transportation or logistics for their onward flights in the United States. These services were coordinated by the state emergency repatriation team.
  • Unaccompanied children coming from Haiti who have been matched with an adoptive family but who do not yet have legal guardians are placed in the custody of the Federal government, and are the responsibility of the Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR). As of Feb.19 at midnight, approximately 470 unaccompanied Haitian children have been put under the care of ORR. Of these, 448 were released to sponsors and 22 unaccompanied Haitian children are being cared for at ORR-designated facilities.* Sponsors are typically prospective adoptive parents who had already begun the process to adopt the child.

*The total number of unaccompanied Haitian children referred by DHS to ORR only reflects those children released into ORR's care. Totals reported before Feb. 8 included some unaccompanied Haitian children who were immediately released into the care of their adoptive parents upon entering the U.S.

February 18, 2010:

  • The HHS medical teams have reported seeing more than 30,453 patients so far, including approximately 359 yesterday, Feb. 17.
  • Since they began seeing patients Jan 17, HHS medical teams have performed 159 surgeries and delivered 39 babies.
  • HHS currently has approximately 142 people deployed in Haiti to support relief efforts.
    • The International Medical Surgical Response Team continues to provide patient care using temporary medical stations set up near a GHESKIO clinic in Port-au-Prince.
    • The teams report seeing patients with chronic disease or who need basic care not necessarily due to the earthquake, an indication that the medical need is returning to routine care rather than emergency care.
  • The U.S. government is working to recover, identify and repatriate the remains of U.S. citizens who perished in the earthquake.
    • A specially trained HHS Family Assistance Center (FAC) Team is working with the U.S. Dept of State and families of U.S. citizens to gather information that will help identify the remains of Americans who died in the earthquake so they can be returned to their families.
    • HHS has provided a disaster portable morgue unit at the Port-au-Prince airport, staffed with mortuary and forensic specialists who will work with the U.S. Dept. of State and U.S. Dept. of Defense to identify remains of U.S. citizens who died in the earthquake.
  • CDC is collaborating with national and international partners to meet urgent public health needs and establishing liaisons and coordination needed for successful, long range public health programs in response to the earthquake.
    • CDC experts participated on Initial Rapid Assessment (IRA) teams that collected health, food, water, nutrition, and sanitation data from 224 sites across Haiti. The IRA has been completed, and CDC staff members in Haiti and Atlanta are assisting with data analysis from the IRAs. These data will be released by the U.N. and used to develop and prioritize immediate interventions.
    • CDC is collaborating with international partners to conduct needs assessments as the basis for the development of long range public health programs in Haiti. CDC staff members are assisting with surveillance of health conditions being diagnosed and treated in health facilities in Haiti. Data on communicable diseases is being collected from over 50 sites. CDC staff are working with Haitian health officials and international partners to analyze the data. Results of the surveillance are being used to prioritize public health interventions, project resources needed by health care facilities as they care for patients, and assist in long-range planning for the reconstruction of the country's health care system.
  • HHS has activated two Federal Coordinating Centers (FCCs) in Atlanta and Tampa as part of the National Disaster Medical System. These two centers are staffed by teams from the Department of Veterans Affairs who will meet NDMS medical evacuation flights from Haiti and arrange ground transport to place patients at appropriate hospitals. Federal Coordinating Centers in New York, NY; Lyons, NJ; Philadelphia, PA; Washington, DC; and Boston, MA are put on alert in case additional capacity is needed to treat patients from Haiti who have life-threatening conditions. Additional information can be found by clicking here.
  • Approximately 26,905 American citizens have returned to the U.S. from Haiti as of midnight Feb. 18. Of these, approximately 7,495 received Administration for Children and Families (ACF)-funded services assistance, such as medical attention, food, short-term lodging, transportation or logistics for their onward flights in the United States. These services were coordinated by the state emergency repatriation team.
  • Unaccompanied children coming from Haiti who have been matched with an adoptive family but who do not yet have legal guardians are placed in the custody of the Federal government, and are the responsibility of the Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR). As of Feb.18 at midnight, approximately 469 unaccompanied Haitian children have been put under the care of ORR. Of these, 440 were released to sponsors and 29 unaccompanied Haitian children are being cared for at ORR-designated facilities.* Sponsors are typically prospective adoptive parents who had already begun the process to adopt the child.

*The total number of unaccompanied Haitian children referred by DHS to ORR only reflects those children released into ORR's care. Totals reported before Feb. 8 included some unaccompanied Haitian children who were immediately released into the care of their adoptive parents upon entering the U.S.

February 16, 2010:

  • The HHS medical teams have reported seeing more than 29,870 patients so far, including approximately 177 yesterday, Feb. 15.
  • Since they began seeing patients Jan 17, HHS medical teams have performed 151 surgeries and delivered 37 babies.
  • HHS currently has approximately 141 people deployed in Haiti to support relief efforts.
    • The International Medical Surgical Response Team continues to provide patient care using temporary medical stations set up near a GHESKIO clinic in Port-au-Prince.
    • The teams report seeing patients with chronic disease or who need basic care not necessarily due to the earthquake, an indication that the medical need is returning to routine care rather than emergency care.
  • The U.S. government is working to recover, identify and repatriate the remains of U.S. citizens who perished in the earthquake.
    • A specially trained HHS Family Assistance Center (FAC) Team is working with the U.S. Dept of State and families of U.S. citizens to gather information that will help identify the remains of Americans who died in the earthquake so they can be returned to their families.
    • HHS has provided a disaster portable morgue unit at the Port-au-Prince airport, staffed with mortuary and forensic specialists who will work with the U.S. Dept. of State and U.S. Dept. of Defense to identify remains of U.S. citizens who died in the earthquake.
  • CDC is collaborating with national and international partners to meet urgent public health needs and establishing liaisons and coordination needed for successful, long range public health programs in response to the earthquake.
    • CDC experts participated on Initial Rapid Assessment (IRA) teams that collected health, food, water, nutrition, and sanitation data from 224 sites across Haiti. The IRA has been completed, and CDC staff members in Haiti and Atlanta are assisting with data analysis from the IRAs. These data will be released by the U.N. and used to develop and prioritize immediate interventions.
    • CDC is collaborating with international partners to conduct needs assessments as the basis for the development of long range public health programs in Haiti. CDC staff members are assisting with surveillance of health conditions being diagnosed and treated in health facilities in Haiti. Data on communicable diseases is being collected from over 50 sites. , CDC staff are working with Haitian health officials and international partners to analyze the data. Results of the surveillance are being used to prioritize public health interventions, project resources needed by health care facilities as they care for patients, and assist in long-range planning for the reconstruction of the country's health care system.
  • HHS has activated two Federal Coordinating Centers (FCCs) in Atlanta and Tampa as part of the National Disaster Medical System. These two centers are staffed by teams from the Department of Veterans Affairs who will meet NDMS medical evacuation flights from Haiti and arrange ground transport to place patients at appropriate hospitals. Federal Coordinating Centers in New York, NY; Lyons, NJ; Philadelphia, PA; Washington, DC; and Boston, MA are put on alert in case additional capacity is needed to treat patients from Haiti who have life-threatening conditions. Additional information can be found by clicking here.
  • Approximately 26,471 American citizens have returned to the U.S. from Haiti as of midnight Feb. 16. Of these, approximately 7,472 received Administration for Children and Families (ACF)-funded services assistance, such as medical attention, food, short-term lodging, transportation or logistics for their onward flights in the United States. These services were coordinated by the state emergency repatriation team.
  • Unaccompanied children coming from Haiti who have been matched with an adoptive family but who do not yet have legal guardians are placed in the custody of the Federal government, and are the responsibility of the Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR). As of Feb.16 at midnight, approximately 443 unaccompanied Haitian children have been put under the care of ORR. Of these, 424 were released to sponsors and 19 unaccompanied Haitian children are being cared for at ORR-designated facilities.* Sponsors are typically prospective adoptive parents who had already begun the process to adopt the child.

*The total number of unaccompanied Haitian children referred by DHS to ORR only reflects those children released into ORR's care. Totals reported before Feb. 8 included some unaccompanied Haitian children who were immediately released into the care of their adoptive parents upon entering the U.S.

February 15, 2010:

  • The HHS medical teams have reported seeing more than 29,580 patients so far, including approximately 119 Feb. 13 and 74 on Feb. 14.
  • Since they began seeing patients Jan 17, HHS medical teams have performed 151 surgeries and delivered 37 babies.
  • HHS currently has approximately 141 people deployed in Haiti to support relief efforts.
    • The International Medical Surgical Response Team continues to provide patient care using temporary medical stations set up near a GHESKIO clinic in Port-au-Prince.
    • The teams report seeing patients with chronic disease or who need basic care not necessarily due to the earthquake, an indication that the medical need is returning to routine care rather than emergency care.
  • The U.S. government is working to recover, identify and repatriate the remains of U.S. citizens who perished in the earthquake.
    • A specially trained HHS Family Assistance Center (FAC) Team is working with the U.S. Dept of State and families of U.S. citizens to gather information that will help identify the remains of Americans who died in the earthquake so they can be returned to their families.
    • HHS has provided a disaster portable morgue unit at the Port-au-Prince airport, staffed with mortuary and forensic specialists who will work with the U.S. Dept. of State and U.S. Dept. of Defense to identify remains of U.S. citizens who died in the earthquake.
  • CDC is collaborating with national and international partners to meet urgent public health needs and establishing liaisons and coordination needed for successful, long range public health programs in response to the earthquake.
    • CDC experts participated on Initial Rapid Assessment (IRA) teams that collected health, food, water, nutrition, and sanitation data from 224 sites across Haiti. The IRA has been completed, and CDC staff members in Haiti and Atlanta are assisting with data analysis from the IRAs. These data will be released by the U.N. and used to develop and prioritize immediate interventions.
    • CDC is collaborating with international partners to conduct needs assessments as the basis for the development of long range public health programs in Haiti. CDC staff members are assisting with surveillance of health conditions being diagnosed and treated in health facilities in Haiti. Data on communicable diseases is being collected from over 50 sites. , CDC staff are working with Haitian health officials and international partners to analyze the data. Results of the surveillance are being used to prioritize public health interventions, project resources needed by health care facilities as they care for patients, and assist in long-range planning for the reconstruction of the country's health care system.
  • HHS has activated two Federal Coordinating Centers (FCCs) in Atlanta and Tampa as part of the National Disaster Medical System. These two centers are staffed by teams from the Department of Veterans Affairs who will meet NDMS medical evacuation flights from Haiti and arrange ground transport to place patients at appropriate hospitals. Federal Coordinating Centers in New York, NY; Lyons, NJ; Philadelphia, PA; Washington, DC; and Boston, MA are put on alert in case additional capacity is needed to treat patients from Haiti who have life-threatening conditions. Additional information can be found by clicking here.
  • Approximately 25,755 American citizens have returned to the U.S. from Haiti as of midnight February 14. Of these, approximately 7,460 received Administration for Children and Families (ACF)-funded services assistance, such as medical attention, food, short-term lodging, transportation or logistics for their onward flights in the United States. These services were coordinated by the state emergency repatriation team.
  • Unaccompanied children coming from Haiti who have been matched with an adoptive family but who do not yet have legal guardians are placed in the custody of the Federal government, and are the responsibility of the Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR). As of Feb.14 at midnight, approximately 443 unaccompanied Haitian children have been put under the care of ORR. Of these, 422 were released to sponsors and 21 unaccompanied Haitian children are being cared for at ORR-designated facilities.* Sponsors are typically prospective adoptive parents who had already begun the process to adopt the child.

*The total number of unaccompanied Haitian children referred by DHS to ORR only reflects those children released into ORR's care. Totals reported before Feb. 8 included some unaccompanied Haitian children who were immediately released into the care of their adoptive parents upon entering the U.S.

February 13, 2010:

  • The HHS medical teams have reported seeing more than 29,389 patients so far, including approximately 220 yesterday, Feb. 12.
  • Since they began seeing patients Jan 17, HHS medical teams have performed 151 surgeries and delivered 37 babies.
  • HHS currently has approximately 184 people deployed in Haiti to support relief efforts.
    • The International Medical Surgical Response Team continues to provide patient care using temporary medical stations set up in a soccer field near a GHESKIO clinic in Port-au-Prince.
    • The teams report seeing patients with chronic disease or who need basic care, an indication that the medical need is returning to routine care rather than emergency care.
  • The U.S. government is working to recover, identify and repatriate the remains of U.S. citizens who perished in the earthquake.
  • A specially trained HHS Family Assistance Center (FAC) Team is working with the U.S. Dept of State and families of U.S. citizens to gather information that will help identify the remains of Americans who died in the earthquake so they can be returned to their families.
  • HHS has provided a disaster portable morgue unit at the Port-au-Prince airport, staffed with mortuary and forensic specialists who will work with the U.S. Dept. of State and U.S. Dept. of Defense to identify remains of U.S. citizens who died in the earthquake.
  • CDC is collaborating with national and international partners to meet urgent public health needs and establishing liaisons and coordination needed for successful, long range public health programs in response to the earthquake.
    • CDC experts participated on Initial Rapid Assessment (IRA) teams that collected health, food, water, nutrition, and sanitation data from 224 sites across Haiti. The IRA has been completed, and CDC staff members in Haiti and Atlanta are assisting with data analysis from the IRAs. These data will be released by the U.N. and used to develop and prioritize immediate interventions.
    • CDC is collaborating with international partners to conduct needs assessments as the basis for the development of long range public health programs in Haiti. CDC staff members are assisting with surveillance of health conditions being diagnosed and treated in health facilities in Haiti. Data on communicable diseases is being collected from over 50 sites. , CDC staff are working with Haitian health officials and international partners to analyze the data. Results of the surveillance are being used to prioritize public health interventions, project resources needed by health care facilities as they care for patients, and assist in long-range planning for the reconstruction of the country's health care system.
  • HHS has activated two Federal Coordinating Centers (FCCs) in Atlanta and Tampa as part of the National Disaster Medical System. These two centers are staffed by teams from the Department of Veterans Affairs who will meet NDMS medical evacuation flights from Haiti and arrange ground transport to place patients at appropriate hospitals. Federal Coordinating Centers in New York, NY; Lyons, NJ; Philadelphia, PA; Washington, DC; and Boston, MA are put on alert in case additional capacity is needed to treat patients from Haiti who have life-threatening conditions. Additional information can be found by clicking here.
  • Approximately 25,332 American citizens have returned to the U.S. from Haiti as of midnight February 13. Of these, approximately 7,446 received Administration for Children and Families (ACF)-funded services assistance, such as medical attention, food, short-term lodging, transportation or logistics for their onward flights in the United States. These services were coordinated by the state emergency repatriation team.
  • Unaccompanied children coming from Haiti who have been matched with an adoptive family but who do not yet have legal guardians are placed in the custody of the Federal government, and are the responsibility of the Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR). As of Feb.13 at midnight, approximately 442 unaccompanied Haitian children have been put under the care of ORR. Of these, 421 were released to sponsors and 21 unaccompanied Haitian children are being cared for at ORR-designated facilities.* Sponsors are typically prospective adoptive parents who had already begun the process to adopt the child.

*The total number of unaccompanied Haitian children referred by DHS to ORR only reflects those children released into ORR's care. Totals reported before Feb. 8 included some unaccompanied Haitian children who were immediately released into the care of their adoptive parents upon entering the U.S.

February 12, 2010:

  • The HHS medical teams have reported seeing more than 29,100 patients so far, including approximately 360 yesterday, Feb. 11.
  • Since they began seeing patients Jan 17, HHS medical teams have performed 139 surgeries and delivered 33 babies.
  • HHS currently has approximately 185 people deployed in Haiti to support relief efforts.
    • The International Medical Surgical Response Team continues to provide patient care using temporary medical stations set up in a soccer field near a GHESKIO clinic in Port-au-Prince.
    • Disaster Medical Assistance Team members are providing primary care at the U.S. embassy and medical support for the recovery team at Hotel Montana.
    • The teams report seeing patients with chronic disease or who need basic care, an indication that the medical need is returning to routine care rather than emergency care.
  • The U.S. government is working to recover, identify and repatriate the remains of U.S. citizens who perished in the earthquake.
  • A specially trained HHS Family Assistance Center (FAC) Team is working with the U.S. Dept of State and families of U.S. citizens to gather information that will help identify the remains of Americans who died in the earthquake so they can be returned to their families.
  • HHS has provided a disaster portable morgue unit at the Port-au-Prince airport, staffed with mortuary and forensic specialists who will work with the U.S. Dept. of State and U.S. Dept. of Defense to identify remains of U.S. citizens who died in the earthquake.
  • CDC is collaborating with national and international partners to meet urgent public health needs and establishing liaisons and coordination needed for successful, long range public health programs in response to the earthquake.
    • CDC experts participated on Initial Rapid Assessment (IRA) teams that collected health, food, water, nutrition, and sanitation data from 224 sites across Haiti. The IRA has been completed, and CDC staff members in Haiti and Atlanta are assisting with data analysis from the IRAs. These data will be released by the U.N. and used to develop and prioritize immediate interventions.
    • CDC is collaborating with international partners to conduct needs assessments as the basis for the development of long range public health programs in Haiti. CDC staff members are assisting with surveillance of health conditions being diagnosed and treated in health facilities in Haiti. Data on communicable diseases is being collected from over 50 sites. , CDC staff are working with Haitian health officials and international partners to analyze the data. Results of the surveillance are being used to prioritize public health interventions, project resources needed by health care facilities as they care for patients, and assist in long-range planning for the reconstruction of the country's health care system.
  • HHS has activated two Federal Coordinating Centers (FCCs) in Atlanta and Tampa as part of the National Disaster Medical System. These two centers are staffed by teams from the Department of Veterans Affairs who will meet NDMS medical evacuation flights from Haiti and arrange ground transport to place patients at appropriate hospitals. Federal Coordinating Centers in New York, NY; Lyons, NJ; Philadelphia, PA; Washington, DC; and Boston, MA are put on alert in case additional capacity is needed to treat patients from Haiti who have life-threatening conditions. Additional information can be found by clicking here.
  • Approximately 25,052 American citizens have returned to the U.S. from Haiti as of midnight February 12. Of these, approximately 7,438 received Administration for Children and Families (ACF)-funded services assistance, such as medical attention, food, short-term lodging, transportation or logistics for their onward flights in the United States. These services were coordinated by the state emergency repatriation team.
  • Unaccompanied children coming from Haiti who have been matched with an adoptive family but who do not yet have legal guardians are placed in the custody of the Federal government, and are the responsibility of the Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR). As of Feb.12 at midnight, approximately 442 unaccompanied Haitian children have been put under the care of ORR. Of these, 421 were released to sponsors and 21 unaccompanied Haitian children are being cared for at ORR-designated facilities.* Sponsors are typically prospective adoptive parents who had already begun the process to adopt the child.

*The total number of unaccompanied Haitian children referred by DHS to ORR only reflects those children released into ORR's care. Totals reported before Feb. 8 included some unaccompanied Haitian children who were immediately released into the care of their adoptive parents upon entering the U.S.

February 11, 2010:

  • The HHS medical teams have reported seeing more than 28,800 patients so far, including approximately 370 yesterday, Feb. 10.
  • Since they began seeing patients Jan 17, HHS medical teams have performed 133 surgeries and delivered 32 babies.
  • HHS currently has approximately 195 people deployed in Haiti to support relief efforts.
    • The International Medical Surgical Response Team continues to provide patient care using temporary medical stations set up in a soccer field near a GHESKIO clinic in Port-au-Prince.
    • Disaster Medical Assistance Team members are providing primary care at the U.S. embassy and medical support for the recovery team at Hotel Montana.
    • The teams report seeing patients with chronic disease or who need basic care, an indication that the medical need is returning to routine care rather than emergency care.
  • The U.S. government is working to recover, identify and repatriate the remains of U.S. citizens who perished in the earthquake.
    • A specially trained HHS Family Assistance Center (FAC) Team is working with the U.S. Dept of State and families of U.S. citizens to gather information that will help identify the remains of Americans who died in the earthquake so they can be returned to their families.
    • HHS has provided a disaster portable morgue unit at the Port-au-Prince airport, staffed with mortuary and forensic specialists who will work with the U.S. Dept. of State and U.S. Dept. of Defense to identify remains of U.S. citizens who died in the earthquake.
  • CDC is collaborating with national and international partners to meet urgent public health needs and establishing liaisons and coordination needed for successful, long range public health programs in response to the earthquake.
    • CDC staff members in Haiti are helping the government of Haiti address urgent public health threats. CDC experts participated on Initial Rapid Assessment (IRA) teams to collect health, food, water, nutrition and sanitation data from 224 sites across Haiti. CDC staff in Haiti and Atlanta are assisting with data analysis from the IRAs. These data will be released by the U.N. and used to develop and prioritize immediate interventions.
    • CDC is collaborating with international partners to conduct needs assessments as the basis for the development of long range public health programs in Haiti. CDC staff members have assisted with pilot surveillance of health conditions being diagnosed and treated in 52 health facilities in Haiti. Data on communicable diseases has been collected from more than half of the 52 sites thus far and changes daily. Working with Haitian health officials and international partners, CDC staff are analyzing initial data submissions. Results of the surveillance will be used to prioritize public health interventions, project resources needed by health care facilities as they care for patients, and assist in long-range planning for the reconstruction of the country's health care system.
  • HHS has activated two Federal Coordinating Centers (FCCs) in Atlanta and Tampa as part of the National Disaster Medical System. These two centers are staffed by teams from the Department of Veterans Affairs who will meet NDMS medical evacuation flights from Haiti and arrange ground transport to place patients at appropriate hospitals. Federal Coordinating Centers in New York, NY; Lyons, NJ; Philadelphia, PA; Washington, DC; and Boston, MA are put on alert in case additional capacity is needed to treat patients from Haiti who have life-threatening conditions.  Additional information can be found by visiting our Web site.
  • Approximately 24,422 American citizens have returned to the U.S. from Haiti as of midnight February 11. Of these, approximately 7,365 received Administration for Children and Families (ACF)-funded services assistance, such as medical attention, food, short-term lodging, transportation or logistics for their onward flights in the United States. These services were coordinated by the state emergency repatriation team.
  • Unaccompanied children coming from Haiti who have been matched with an adoptive family but who do not yet have legal guardians are placed in the custody of the Federal government, and are the responsibility of the Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR).  As of Feb. 11 at midnight, approximately 436 unaccompanied Haitian children have been put under the care of ORR.  Of these, 416 were released to sponsors and 20 unaccompanied Haitian children are being cared for at ORR-designated facilities.* Sponsors are typically prospective adoptive parents who had already begun the process to adopt the child.

*The total number of unaccompanied Haitian children referred by DHS to ORR only reflects those children released into ORR's care.  Totals reported before Feb. 8 included some unaccompanied Haitian children who were immediately released into the care of their adoptive parents upon entering the U.S.

February 10, 2010:

  • The HHS medical teams have reported seeing more than 28,400 patients so far, including approximately 430 yesterday, Feb. 9.
  • Since they began seeing patients Jan 17, HHS medical teams have performed 126 surgeries and delivered 32 babies.
  • HHS currently has approximately 195 people deployed in Haiti to support relief efforts.
    • The International Medical Surgical Response Team continues to provide patient care using temporary medical stations set up in a soccer field near a GHESKIO clinic in Port-au-Prince.
    • Disaster Medical Assistance Team members are providing primary care at the U.S. embassy and medical support for the recovery team at Hotel Montana.
    • The teams report seeing patients with chronic disease or who need basic care, an indication that the medical need is returning to routine care rather than emergency care.
  • The U.S. government is working to recover, identify and repatriate the remains of U.S. citizens who perished in the earthquake.
    • A specially trained HHS Family Assistance Center (FAC) Team is working with the U.S. Dept of State and families of U.S. citizens to gather information that will help identify the remains of Americans who died in the earthquake so they can be returned to their families.
    • HHS has provided a disaster portable morgue unit at the Port-au-Prince airport, staffed with mortuary and forensic specialists who will work with the U.S. Dept. of State and U.S. Dept. of Defense to identify remains of U.S. citizens who died in the earthquake.
  • CDC is collaborating with national and international partners to meet urgent public health needs and establishing liaisons and coordination needed for successful, long range public health programs in response to the earthquake.
    • CDC staff members in Haiti are helping the government of Haiti address urgent public health threats. CDC experts participated on Initial Rapid Assessment (IRA) teams to collect health, food, water, nutrition and sanitation data from 224 sites across Haiti. CDC staff in Haiti and Atlanta are assisting with data analysis from the IRAs. These data will be released by the U.N. and used to develop and prioritize immediate interventions.
    • CDC is collaborating with international partners to conduct needs assessments as the basis for the development of long range public health programs in Haiti. CDC staff members have assisted with pilot surveillance of health conditions being diagnosed and treated in 52 health facilities in Haiti. Data on communicable diseases has been collected from about 50 percent of the 52 sites thus far and changes daily. Working with Haitian health officials and international partners, CDC staff are analyzing initial data submissions. Results of the surveillance will be used to prioritize public health interventions, project resources needed by health care facilities as they care for patients, and assist in long-range planning for the reconstruction of the country's health care system.
  • HHS has activated two Federal Coordinating Centers (FCCs) in Atlanta and Tampa as part of the National Disaster Medical System. These two centers are staffed by teams from the Department of Veterans Affairs who will meet NDMS medical evacuation flights from Haiti and arrange ground transport to place patients at appropriate hospitals. Federal Coordinating Centers in New York, NY; Lyons, NJ; Philadelphia, PA; Washington, DC; and Boston, MA are put on alert in case additional capacity is needed to treat patients from Haiti who have life-threatening conditions. Additional information can be found by visiting our Web site.
  • Approximately 23,648 American citizens have returned to the U.S. from Haiti as of midnight February 9. Of these, approximately 7,337 received Administration for Children and Families (ACF)-funded services assistance, such as medical attention, food, short-term lodging, transportation or logistics for their onward flights in the United States. These services were coordinated by the state emergency repatriation team.
  • Unaccompanied children coming from Haiti who have been matched with an adoptive family but who do not yet have legal guardians are placed in the custody of the Federal government, and are the responsibility of the Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR).  As of Feb. 9 at 9:00 a.m., approximately 364 unaccompanied Haitian children have been put under the care of ORR.  Of these, 344 were released to sponsors and 20 unaccompanied Haitian children are being cared for at ORR-designated facilities.* Sponsors are typically prospective adoptive parents who had already begun the process to adopt the child.

*The total number of unaccompanied Haitian children referred by DHS to ORR only reflects those children released into ORR's care.  Totals reported before Feb. 8 included some unaccompanied Haitian children who were immediately released into the care of their adoptive parents upon entering the U.S.

February 9, 2010:

  • The HHS medical teams have reported seeing more than 27,900 patients so far, including approximately 600 yesterday, Feb. 8.
  • Since they began seeing patients Jan 17, HHS medical teams have performed 122 surgeries and delivered 31 babies.
  • HHS currently has approximately 195 people deployed in Haiti to support relief efforts.
    • The International Medical Surgical Response Team continues to provide patient care using temporary medical stations set up in a soccer field near a GHESKIO clinic in Port-au-Prince.
    • Disaster Medical Assistance Team members are providing primary care at the U.S. embassy and medical support for the recovery team at Hotel Montana.
    • The teams report seeing patients with chronic disease or who need basic care, an indication that the medical need is returning to routine care rather than emergency care.
  • The U.S. government is working to recover, identify and repatriate the remains of U.S. citizens who perished in the earthquake.
    • A specially trained HHS Family Assistance Center (FAC) Team is working with the U.S. Dept of State and families of U.S. citizens to gather information that will help identify the remains of Americans who died in the earthquake so they can be returned to their families.
    • HHS has provided a disaster portable morgue unit at the Port-au-Prince airport, staffed with mortuary and forensic specialists who will work with the U.S. Dept. of State and U.S. Dept. of Defense to identify remains of U.S. citizens who died in the earthquake.
  • CDC is collaborating with national and international partners to meet urgent public health needs and establishing liaisons and coordination needed for successful, long range public health programs in response to the earthquake.
    • CDC staff members in Haiti are helping the government of Haiti address urgent public health threats. CDC experts participated on Initial Rapid Assessment (IRA) teams to collect health, food, water, nutrition and sanitation data from 224 sites across Haiti. CDC staff in Haiti and Atlanta are assisting with data analysis from the IRAs. These data will be released by the U.N. and used to develop and prioritize immediate interventions.
    • CDC is collaborating with international partners to conduct needs assessments as the basis for the development of long range public health programs in Haiti. CDC staff members have assisted with pilot surveillance of health conditions being diagnosed and treated in 52 health facilities in Haiti. Data on communicable diseases has been collected from about 50 percent of the 52 sites thus far and changes daily. Working with Haitian health officials and international partners, CDC staff are analyzing initial data submissions. Results of the surveillance will be used to prioritize public health interventions, project resources needed by health care facilities as they care for patients, and assist in long-range planning for the reconstruction of the country's health care system.
  • HHS has activated two Federal Coordinating Centers (FCCs) in Atlanta and Tampa as part of the National Disaster Medical System. These two centers are staffed by teams from the Department of Veterans Affairs who will meet NDMS medical evacuation flights from Haiti and arrange ground transport to place patients at appropriate hospitals. Federal Coordinating Centers in New York, NY; Lyons, NJ; Philadelphia, PA; Washington, DC; and Boston, MA are put on alert in case additional capacity is needed to treat patients from Haiti who have life-threatening conditions. Additional information can be found by visiting our Web site.
  • Approximately 23,648 American citizens have returned to the U.S. from Haiti as of midnight February 9. Of these, approximately 7,337 received Administration for Children and Families (ACF)-funded services assistance, such as medical attention, food, short-term lodging, transportation or logistics for their onward flights in the United States. These services were coordinated by the state emergency repatriation team.
  • Unaccompanied children coming from Haiti who have been matched with an adoptive family but who do not yet have legal guardians are placed in the custody of the Federal government, and are the responsibility of the Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR). As of Feb. 9 at 9:00 a.m., approximately 364 unaccompanied Haitian children have been put under the care of ORR. Of these, 344 were released to sponsors and 20 unaccompanied Haitian children are being cared for at ORR-designated facilities.* Sponsors are typically prospective adoptive parents who had already begun the process to adopt the child.

*The total number of unaccompanied Haitian children referred by DHS to ORR only reflects those children released into ORR's care. Totals reported before Feb. 8 included some unaccompanied Haitian children who were immediately released into the care of their adoptive parents upon entering the U.S.

February 8, 2010:

  • The HHS medical teams have reported seeing more than 27,390 patients so far, including approximately 390 yesterday, Feb. 7.
  • Since they began seeing patients Jan 17, HHS medical teams have performed 117 surgeries and delivered 31 babies.
  • HHS currently has approximately 200 people deployed in Haiti to support relief efforts.
    • The International Medical Surgical Response Team continues to provide patient care using temporary medical stations set up in a soccer field near a GHESKIO clinic in Port-au-Prince.
    • Disaster Medical Assistance Team members are providing primary care at the U.S. embassy and medical support for the recovery team at Hotel Montana.
    • The teams report seeing patients with chronic disease or who need basic care, an indication that the medical need is returning to routine care rather than emergency care.
  • The U.S. government is working to recover, identify and repatriate the remains of U.S. citizens who perished in the earthquake.
    • A specially trained HHS Family Assistance Center (FAC) Team is working with the U.S. Dept of State and families of U.S. citizens to gather information that will help identify the remains of Americans who died in the earthquake so they can be returned to their families.
    • HHS has provided a disaster portable morgue unit at the Port-au-Prince airport, staffed with mortuary and forensic specialists who will work with the U.S. Dept. of State and U.S. Dept. of Defense to identify remains of U.S. citizens who died in the earthquake.
  • CDC is collaborating with national and international partners to meet urgent public health needs and establishing liaisons and coordination needed for successful, long range public health programs in response to the earthquake.
    • CDC staff members in Haiti are helping the government of Haiti address urgent public health threats. CDC experts participated on Initial Rapid Assessment (IRA) teams to collect health, food, water, nutrition and sanitation data from 224 sites across Haiti. CDC staff in Haiti and Atlanta are assisting with data analysis from the IRAs. These data will be released by the U.N. and used to develop and prioritize immediate interventions.
    • CDC is collaborating with international partners to conduct needs assessments as the basis for the development of long range public health programs in Haiti. CDC staff members have assisted with pilot surveillance of health conditions being diagnosed and treated in 52 health facilities in Haiti. Data on communicable diseases has been collected from about 50 percent of the 52 sites thus far and changes daily. Working with Haitian health officials and international partners, CDC staff are analyzing initial data submissions. Results of the surveillance will be used to prioritize public health interventions, project resources needed by health care facilities as they care for patients, and assist in long-range planning for the reconstruction of the country's health care system.
  • HHS has activated two Federal Coordinating Centers (FCCs) in Atlanta and Tampa as part of the National Disaster Medical System. These two centers are staffed by teams from the Department of Veterans Affairs who will meet NDMS medical evacuation flights from Haiti and arrange ground transport to place patients at appropriate hospitals. Federal Coordinating Centers in New York, NY; Lyons, NJ; Philadelphia, PA; Washington, DC; and Boston, MA are put on alert in case additional capacity is needed to treat patients from Haiti who have life-threatening conditions.  Additional information can be found by visiting our Web site.
  • Approximately 23,433 American citizens have returned to the U.S. from Haiti as of midnight February 8. Of these, approximately 7,324 received Administration for Children and Families (ACF)-funded services assistance, such as medical attention, food, short-term lodging, transportation or logistics for their onward flights in the United States. These services were coordinated by the state emergency repatriation team.
  • Unaccompanied children coming from Haiti who have been matched with an adoptive family but who do not yet have legal guardians are placed in the custody of the Federal government, and are the responsibility of the Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR). As of Feb. 8 at 9:00 a.m., approximately 364 unaccompanied Haitian children have been put under the care of ORR. Of these, 341 were released to sponsors and 23 unaccompanied Haitian children are being cared for at ORR-designated facilities.* Sponsors are typically prospective adoptive parents who had already begun the process to adopt the child.

*As of today, the total number of unaccompanied Haitian children referred by DHS to ORR only reflect those children released into ORR's care. Previous totals included some unaccompanied Haitian children who were immediately released into the care of their adoptive parents upon entering the U.S.

February 7, 2010:

  • The HHS medical teams have reported seeing more than 27,000 patients so far, including approximately 450 yesterday, Feb. 6.
  • Since they began seeing patients Jan 17, HHS medical teams have performed 115 surgeries and delivered 31 babies.
  • HHS currently has approximately 200 people deployed in Haiti to support relief efforts.
    • The International Medical Surgical Response Team continues to provide patient care using temporary medical stations set up in a soccer field near a GHESKIO clinic in Port-au-Prince.
    • Disaster Medical Assistance Team members are providing primary care at the U.S. embassy and medical support for the recovery team at Hotel Montana.
    • The teams report seeing patients with chronic disease or who need basic care, an indication that the medical need is returning to routine care rather than emergency care.
  • The U.S. government is working to recover, identify and repatriate the remains of U.S. citizens who perished in the earthquake.
    • A specially trained HHS Family Assistance Center (FAC) Team is working with the U.S. Dept of State and families of U.S. citizens to gather information that will help identify the remains of Americans who died in the earthquake so they can be returned to their families.
    • HHS has provided a disaster portable morgue unit at the Port-au-Prince airport, staffed with mortuary and forensic specialists who will work with the U.S. Dept. of State and U.S. Dept. of Defense to identify remains of U.S. citizens who died in the earthquake.
  • CDC is collaborating with national and international partners to meet urgent public health needs and establishing liaisons and coordination needed for successful, long range public health programs in response to the earthquake.
    • CDC staff members in Haiti are helping the government of Haiti address urgent public health threats. CDC experts participated on Initial Rapid Assessment (IRA) teams to collect health, food, water, nutrition and sanitation data from sites across Haiti. CDC staff in Haiti and Atlanta are assisting with data analysis from the IRAs. These data will be released by the U.N. and used to develop and prioritize immediate interventions.
    • CDC is collaborating with international partners to conduct needs assessments as the basis for the development of long range public health programs in Haiti. CDC staff members have assisted with pilot surveillance of health conditions being diagnosed and treated in 52 health facilities in Haiti. Initial reports have been received from 22 of the health facilities among the sentinel sites. Working with Haitian health officials and international partners, CDC staff are analyzing initial data submissions. Results of the surveillance will be used to prioritize public health interventions, project resources needed by health care facilities as they care for patients, and assist in long-range planning for the reconstruction of the country's health care system.
  • HHS has activated two Federal Coordinating Centers (FCCs) in Atlanta and Tampa as part of the National Disaster Medical System. These two centers are staffed by teams from the Department of Veterans Affairs who will meet NDMS medical evacuation flights from Haiti and arrange ground transport to place patients at appropriate hospitals. Federal Coordinating Centers in New York, NY; Lyons, NJ; Philadelphia, PA; Washington, DC; and Boston, MA are put on alert in case additional capacity is needed to treat patients from Haiti who have life-threatening conditions. Additional information can be found by visiting our Web site.
  • Approximately 23,019 American citizens have returned to the U.S. from Haiti as of midnight February 7. Of these, approximately 7,180 received Administration for Children and Families (ACF)-funded services assistance, such as medical attention, food, short-term lodging, transportation or logistics for their onward flights in the United States. These services were coordinated by the state emergency repatriation team.
  • Unaccompanied children coming from Haiti who have been matched with an adoptive family but who do not yet have legal guardians are placed in the custody of the Federal government, and are the responsibility of the Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR). As of Feb. 4 at 9:00 a.m., approximately 372 unaccompanied Haitian children have been put under the care of ORR. Of these, 312 were released to sponsors and 60 unaccompanied Haitian children are being cared for at ORR-designated facilities. Sponsors are typically prospective adoptive parents who had already begun the process to adopt the child.

February 6, 2010:

  • The HHS medical teams have reported seeing more than 26,500 patients so far, including approximately 350 yesterday, Feb. 5.
  • Since they began seeing patients Jan 17, HHS medical teams have performed 112 surgeries and delivered 31 babies.
  • HHS currently has approximately 200 people deployed in Haiti to support relief efforts.
    • The International Medical Surgical Response Team continues to provide patient care using temporary medical stations set up in a soccer field near a GHESKIO clinic in Port-au-Prince.
    • Disaster Medical Assistance Team members are providing primary care at the U.S. embassy and medical support for the recovery team at Hotel Montana.
    • The teams report seeing patients with chronic disease or who need basic care, an indication that the medical need is returning to routine care rather than emergency care.
  • The U.S. government is working to recover, identify and repatriate the remains of U.S. citizens who perished in the earthquake.
    • A specially trained HHS Family Assistance Center (FAC) Team is working with the U.S. Dept of State and families of U.S. citizens to gather information that will help identify the remains of Americans who died in the earthquake so they can be returned to their families.
    • HHS has provided a disaster portable morgue unit at the Port-au-Prince airport, staffed with mortuary and forensic specialists who will work with the U.S. Dept. of State and U.S. Dept. of Defense to identify remains of U.S. citizens who died in the earthquake.
  • Public health experts from the HHS Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are working with the Haitian Ministry of Health and the Pan American Health Organization on public health assessment teams to identify health threats.
    • CDC is working with the Haiti National Laboratory to reconstruct the lab and maintain contact with more than 50 sentinel sites, collating and entering data, analyzing and reporting.
    • CDC staff members in Haiti are working with the public health assessment teams that are mapping health threats Haiti now faces, so that donated resources can be directed to areas where they can be used most effectively.
  • HHS has activated two Federal Coordinating Centers (FCCs) in Atlanta and Tampa as part of the National Disaster Medical System. These two centers are staffed by teams from the Department of Veterans Affairs who will meet NDMS medical evacuation flights from Haiti and arrange ground transport to place patients at appropriate hospitals. Federal Coordinating Centers in New York, NY; Lyons, NJ; Philadelphia, PA; Washington, DC; and Boston, MA are put on alert in case additional capacity is needed to treat patients from Haiti who have life-threatening conditions. Additional information can be found by visiting our Web site.
  • Approximately 21,406 American citizens have returned to the U.S. from Haiti as of midnight February 5. Of these, approximately 7,033 received Administration for Children and Families (ACF)-funded services assistance, such as medical attention, food, short-term lodging, transportation or logistics for their onward flights in the United States. These services were coordinated by the state emergency repatriation team.
  • Unaccompanied children coming from Haiti who have been matched with an adoptive family but who do not yet have legal guardians are placed in the custody of the Federal government, and are the responsibility of the Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR). As of Feb. 4 at 9:00 a.m., approximately 372 unaccompanied Haitian children have been put under the care of ORR. Of these, 312 were released to sponsors and 60 unaccompanied Haitian children are being cared for at ORR-designated facilities. Sponsors are typically prospective adoptive parents who had already begun the process to adopt the child.

February 5, 2010:

  • The HHS medical teams have reported seeing more than 26,100 patients so far, including approximately 390 yesterday, Feb. 4.
  • Since they began seeing patients Jan. 17, HHS medical teams have performed 111 surgeries and delivered 31 babies.
  • HHS currently has approximately 275 people deployed in Haiti to support relief efforts.
    • The International Medical Surgical Response Team continues to provide patient care using temporary medical stations set up in a soccer field near a GHESKIO clinic in Port-au-Prince.
    • Disaster Medical Assistance Team members are providing primary care at the U.S. embassy and medical support for the recovery team at Hotel Montana.
    • The teams report seeing patients with chronic disease or who need basic care indicating that the medical need is returning to routine care rather than emergency care.
  • The U.S. government is working to recover, identify and repatriate the remains of U.S. citizens who perished in the earthquake.
    • A specially trained HHS Family Assistance Center (FAC) Team is working with the U.S. Dept of State and families of U.S. citizens to gather information that will help identify the remains of Americans who died in the earthquake so they can be returned to their families.
    • HHS has provided a disaster portable morgue unit at the Port-au-Prince airport, staffed with mortuary and forensic specialists who will work with the U.S. Dept. of State and U.S. Dept. of Defense to identify remains of U.S. citizens who died in the earthquake.
  • Public health experts from the HHS Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are working with the Haitian Ministry of Health and the Pan American Health Organization on public health assessment teams to identify health threats.
    • CDC is working with the Haiti National Laboratory to reconstruct the lab and maintain contact with more than 50 sentinel sites, collating and entering data, analyzing and reporting.
    • CDC staff members in Haiti are working with the public health assessment teams that are mapping health threats Haiti now faces, so that donated resources can be directed to areas where they can be used most effectively.
  • HHS has activated two Federal Coordinating Centers (FCCs) in Atlanta and Tampa as part of the National Disaster Medical System. These two centers are staffed by teams from the Department of Veterans Affairs who will meet NDMS medical evacuation flights from Haiti and arrange ground transport to place patients at appropriate hospitals. Federal Coordinating Centers in New York, NY; Lyons, NJ; Philadelphia, PA; Washington, DC; and Boston, MA are put on alert in case additional capacity is needed to treat patients from Haiti who have life-threatening conditions. Additional information can be found by visiting our Web site.
  • Approximately 21,406 American citizens have returned to the U.S. from Haiti as of midnight February 5. Of these, approximately 7,033 received Administration for Children and Families (ACF)-funded services assistance, such as medical attention, food, short-term lodging, transportation or logistics for their onward flights in the United States. These services were coordinated by the state emergency repatriation team.
  • Unaccompanied children coming from Haiti who have been matched with an adoptive family but who do not yet have legal guardians are placed in the custody of the Federal government, and are the responsibility of the Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR). As of Feb. 4 at 9:00 a.m., approximately 372 unaccompanied Haitian children have been put under the care of ORR. Of these, 312 were released to sponsors and 60 unaccompanied Haitian children are being cared for at ORR-designated facilities. Sponsors are typically prospective adoptive parents who had already begun the process to adopt the child.

February 4, 2010:

  • The HHS medical teams have reported seeing more than 25,800 patients so far, including approximately 440 yesterday, Feb. 3.
  • Since they began seeing patients Jan 17, HHS medical teams have performed 108 surgeries and delivered 30 babies.
  • HHS currently has approximately 275 people deployed in Haiti to support relief efforts.
    • The HHS teams report seeing patients with chronic disease or who need basic care and fewer patients with traumatic injuries.
    • A Disaster Medical Assistance Team and the International Medical Surgical Response Team continue to provide patient care using temporary medical stations set up in a soccer field near a GHESKIO clinic in Port-au-Prince.
    • Additional teams are providing care at the U.S. embassy, and the Love-a-Child facility in Fond Parisien.  Teams are also assisting with medical screening for passengers at the airport and providing medical support for the recovery team at Hotel Montana.
  • The U.S. government is making every effort to working to recover, identify and repatriate the remains of U.S. citizens who perished in the earthquake.
    • A specially trained HHS Family Assistance Center (FAC) Team is working with the U.S. Dept of State and families of U.S. citizens to gather information that will help identify the remains of Americans who died in the earthquake so they can be returned to their families.
    • HHS has provided a disaster portable morgue unit at the Port-au-Prince airport, staffed with mortuary and forensic specialists who will work with the U.S. Dept. of State and U.S. Dept. of Defense to identify remains of U.S. citizens who died in the earthquake.
  • Public health experts from the HHS Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are working with the Haitian Ministry of Health and the Pan American Health Organization on public health assessment teams to identify health threats.
    • CDC is working with the Haiti National Laboratory to reconstruct the lab and maintain contact with 52 sentinel sites, collating and entering data, analyzing and reporting.
    • CDC staff members in Haiti are working with the public health assessment teams that are mapping health threats Haiti now faces, so that donated resources can be directed to areas where they can be used most effectively.
  • HHS has activated two Federal Coordinating Centers (FCCs) in Atlanta and Tampa as part of the National Disaster Medical System. These two centers are staffed by teams from the Department of Veterans Affairs who will meet NDMS medical evacuation flights from Haiti and arrange ground transport to place patients at appropriate hospitals. Federal Coordinating Centers in New York, NY; Lyons, NJ; Philadelphia, PA; Washington, DC; and Boston, MA are put on alert in case additional capacity is needed to treat patients from Haiti who have life-threatening conditions.  Additional information can be found by visiting our Web site.
  • Approximately 21,163 American citizens have returned to the U.S. from Haiti as of midnight February 4. Of these, approximately 6,990 received Administration for Children and Families (ACF)-funded services assistance, such as medical attention, food, short-term lodging, transportation or logistics for their onward flights in the United States. These services were coordinated by the state emergency repatriation team.
  • Unaccompanied children coming from Haiti who have been matched with an adoptive family but who do not yet have legal guardians are placed in the custody of the Federal government, and are the responsibility of the Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR).  As of Feb. 4 at 9:00 a.m., approximately 372 unaccompanied Haitian children have been put under the care of ORR.  Of these, 312 were released to sponsors and 60 unaccompanied Haitian children are being cared for at ORR-designated facilities.  Sponsors are typically prospective adoptive parents who had already begun the process to adopt the child.  

February 3, 2010:

  • The HHS medical teams have reported seeing more than 25,300 patients so far, including approximately 700 yesterday, Feb. 2.
  • Since they began seeing patients Jan 17, HHS medical teams have performed 106 surgeries and delivered 29 babies.
  • HHS currently has approximately 275 people deployed in Haiti to support relief efforts.
    • A Disaster Medical Assistance Team and the International Medical Surgical Response Team continue to provide patient care using temporary medical stations set up in a soccer field near a GHESKIO clinic in Port-au-Prince.
    • Additional teams are providing care at the U.S. embassy, and the Love-a-Child facility in Fond Parisien. Teams are also assisting with medical screening for passengers at the airport.
  • HHS is providing approximately 30 tons of medical equipment to USAID for use in a facility where patients treated aboard the U.S. Navy’s hospital ship, the USNS Comfort, can be moved to receive aftercare. This 250-bed interim aftercare facility will allow more patients to receive critical and comprehensive post-operative medical care and will free up much needed medical treatment space on the USNS Comfort.
  • The U.S. government is making every effort to recover, identify and repatriate the remains of U.S. citizens who perished in the earthquake. An HHS Family Assistance Center (FAC) Team is working with the U.S. Department of State, the U.S. Department of Defense, and families of U.S. citizens to gather information that will help identify Americans who died so they may be reunited with their families and brought to their final resting place in the United States. For more information on the Family Assistance Center.
  • HHS has provided a disaster portable morgue unit at the Port-au-Prince airport, staffed with mortuary and forensic specialists who will work with the U.S. Dept. of State and U.S. Dept. of Defense to identify remains of U.S. citizens who died in the earthquake.
  • Public health experts from HHS Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) are participating on teams conducting rapid assessments of ongoing surveillance of health conditions in Haiti. Teams are creating snapshots of the current situation related to water safety, food supply, shelter conditions, and other health threats at more than 50 sentinel surveillance sites. These data will be used to develop and prioritize immediate interventions. CDC experts have developed with international partners a public health surveillance instrument for ongoing assessments of types and numbers cases of disease, injury, and other health conditions. The surveillance is being piloted in hospitals and other health facilities across Haiti.
  • HHS has activated two Federal Coordinating Centers (FCCs) in Atlanta and Tampa as part of the National Disaster Medical System. These two centers are staffed by teams from the Department of Veterans Affairs who will meet NDMS medical evacuation flights from Haiti and arrange ground transport to place patients at appropriate hospitals. Federal Coordinating Centers in New York, NY; Lyons, NJ; Philadelphia, PA; Washington, DC; and Boston, MA are put on alert in case additional capacity is needed to treat patients from Haiti who have life-threatening conditions. Additional information can be found by visiting our Web site.
  • Approximately 20,774 American citizens have returned to the U.S. as of midnight February 3. Of these, approximately 6,948 received Administration for Children and Families (ACF)-funded services assistance, such as medical attention, food, short-term lodging, transportation or logistics for their onward flights in the United States. These services were coordinated by the state emergency repatriation team.
  • Unaccompanied children coming from Haiti who have been matched with an adoptive family but who do not yet have legal guardians are placed in the custody of the Federal government, and are the responsibility of the Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR). As of Feb. 3 at 9:00 a.m., approximately 328 unaccompanied Haitian children have been put under the care of ORR. Of these, 271 were released to sponsors and 57 unaccompanied Haitian children are being cared for at ORR-designated facilities. Sponsors are typically prospective adoptive parents who had already begun the process to adopt the child.

February 2, 2010:

  • The HHS medical teams have reported seeing more than 24,500 patients so far, including approximately 1,300 yesterday, Feb. 1.
  • Since they began seeing patients Jan 17, HHS medical teams have performed more than 100 surgeries and delivered 28 babies.
  • HHS currently has approximately 275 people deployed in Haiti to support relief efforts.
    • A Disaster Medical Assistance Team and the International Medical Surgical Response Team continue to provide patient care using temporary medical stations set up in a soccer field near a GHESKIO clinic in Port-au-Prince.
    • Additional teams are providing primary care at Thebaud, at the U.S. embassy, and the Love-a-Child facility in Port-au-Prince. Teams are also assisting with medical screening for passengers at the airport.
  • HHS is providing approximately 30 tons of medical equipment to USAID for use in a facility where patients treated aboard the U.S. Navy’s hospital ship, the USNS Comfort, can be moved to receive aftercare. This will help providing continuous care for patients and will free up much needed medical treatment space on the USNS Comfort.
  • The U.S. government is making every effort to recover, identify and repatriate the remains of U.S. citizens who perished in the earthquake. An HHS Family Assistance Center (FAC) Team is working with the U.S. Department of State, the U.S. Department of Defense, and families of U.S. citizens to gather information that will help identify Americans who died so they may be reunited with their families and brought to their final resting place in the United States. For more information on the Family Assistance Center.
  • Public health experts from HHS Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) are participating on teams conducting rapid assessments of ongoing surveillance of health conditions in Haiti. Teams are creating snapshots of the current situation related to water safety, food supply, shelter conditions, and other health threats at more than 50 sentinel surveillance sites. These data will be used to develop and prioritize immediate interventions. CDC experts have developed with international partners a public health surveillance instrument for ongoing assessments of types and numbers cases of disease, injury, and other health conditions. The surveillance is being piloted in hospitals and other health facilities across Haiti.
  • As part of the ongoing medical response to the Haiti earthquake, HHS is utilizing additional components of the National Disaster Medical System (NDMS) to help U.S. hospitals provide care to critically ill survivors.
  • HHS will use the National Disaster Medical System (NDMS) to reimburse participating hospitals for care provided to American and Haitian patients evacuated with life-threatening injuries due to the earthquake.
  • Haitian and American patients will be referred by Haitian hospitals, NGOs, USNS Comfort, or other facilities if they meet criteria for evacuation. Evacuations are being reserved for the patients with life-threatening conditions that cannot be handled within Haiti. There must also be a reasonable chance that the patient can survive the flight and the treatment in the U.S.
  • Hospitals that participate in the NDMS can receive federal reimbursement at 110% of Medicare rates for costs they incur in treating these patients. Hospitals are eligible for reimbursement only for patients who, before leaving Haiti, have gone through the NDMS medical screening process and meet the evacuation criteria.
  • HHS has activated two Federal Coordinating Centers (FCCs) in Atlanta and Tampa. These two centers are staffed by teams from the Department of Veterans Affairs who will meet the flights and arrange ground transport to appropriate hospitals.
  • Approximately 20,374 American citizens have returned to the U.S. as of midnight February 2. Of these, approximately 6,917 received Administration for Children and Families (ACF)-funded services assistance, such as medical attention, food, short-term lodging, transportation or logistics for their onward flights in the United States. These services were coordinated by the state emergency repatriation team.
  • Unaccompanied children coming from Haiti who have been matched with an adoptive family but who do not yet have legal guardians are placed in the custody of the Federal government, and are the responsibility of the Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR). As of Feb. 2 at 9:00 a.m., approximately 289 unaccompanied Haitian children have been put under the care of ORR. Of these, 265 were released to sponsors and 24 unaccompanied Haitian children are being cared for at ORR-designated facilities. Sponsors are typically prospective adoptive parents who had already begun the process to adopt the child.

February 1, 2010:

  • The HHS medical teams have reported seeing more than 23,200 patients so far, including approximately 975 yesterday, Jan. 31.
  • Since they began seeing patients Jan 17, HHS medical teams have performed 98 surgeries and delivered 28 babies.
  • HHS currently has approximately 275 people deployed in Haiti to support relief efforts.
    • A Disaster Medical Assistance Team and the International Medical Surgical Response Team continue to provide patient care using temporary medical stations set up in a soccer field near a GHESKIO clinic in Port-au-Prince.
    • Additional teams are providing primary care at Thebaud, at the U.S. embassy, and at a Forward Operating Base in Petionville, as well as assisting with medical screening for passengers at the airport and triaging patients flown aboard the Navy hospital ship USNS Comfort.
    • Although the teams continue to treat traumatic injuries, they report seeing an increasing number of patients with chronic disease, patients who need wound care or basic care.
  • The U.S. government is making every effort to recover, identify and repatriate the remains of U.S. citizens who perished in the earthquake. An HHS Family Assistance Center (FAC) Team is working with the U.S. Department of State, the U.S. Department of Defense, and families of U.S. citizens to gather information that will help identify Americans who died so they may be reunited with their families and brought to their final resting place in the United States. For more information on the Family Assistance Center.
  • Public health experts from HHS Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) are participating on teams conducting rapid assessments of ongoing surveillance of health conditions in Haiti. Teams are creating snapshots of the current situation related to water safety, food supply, shelter conditions, and other health threats at 51 sentinel surveillance sites. These data will be used to develop and prioritize immediate interventions. CDC experts have developed with international partners a public health surveillance instrument for ongoing assessments of types and numbers cases of disease, injury, and other health conditions. The surveillance is being piloted in hospitals and other health facilities across Haiti.
  • Approximately 20,041 American citizens have returned to the U.S. as of midnight February 1. Of these, approximately 6,912 received Administration for Children and Families (ACF)-funded services assistance, such as medical attention, food, short-term lodging, transportation or logistics for their onward flights in the United States. These services were coordinated by the state emergency repatriation team.
  • Unaccompanied children coming from Haiti who have been matched with an adoptive family but who do not yet have legal guardians are placed in the custody of the Federal government, and are the responsibility of the Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR). As of February 1 at 9:00 a.m., approximately 289 unaccompanied Haitian children have been put under the care of ORR. Of these, 265 were released to sponsors and 24 unaccompanied Haitian children are being cared for at ORR-designated facilities. Sponsors are typically prospective adoptive parents who had already begun the process to adopt the child.

January 31, 2010:

  • The HHS medical teams have reported seeing more than 22,200 patients so far, including approximately 1,450 yesterday, Jan. 30.
  • Since they began seeing patients Jan 17, HHS medical teams have performed 84 surgeries and delivered 28 babies.
  • HHS currently has approximately 270 people deployed in Haiti to support relief efforts.
    • A Disaster Medical Assistance Team and the International Medical Surgical Response Team continue to provide patient care using temporary medical stations set up in a soccer field near a GHESKIO clinic in Port-au-Prince.
    • Additional teams are providing primary care at Thebaud, at the U.S. embassy, and at a Forward Operating Base in Petionville, as well as assisting with medical screening for passengers at the airport and triaging patients flown aboard the Navy hospital ship USNS Comfort.
    • Although the teams continue to treat traumatic injuries, they report seeing an increasing number of patients with chronic disease, patients who need wound care or basic care.
  • The U.S. government is making every effort to recover, identify and repatriate the remains of U.S. citizens who perished in the earthquake. An HHS Family Assistance Center (FAC) Team is working with the U.S. Department of State, the U.S. Department of Defense, and families of U.S. citizens to gather information that will help identify Americans who died so they may be reunited with their families and brought to their final resting place in the United States. For more information on the Family Assistance Center.
  • Public health experts from HHS Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) are participating on teams conducting rapid assessments of ongoing surveillance of health conditions in Haiti. Teams are creating snapshots of the current situation related to water safety, food supply, shelter conditions, and other health threats at over 50 sentinel surveillance sites. These data will be used to develop and prioritize immediate interventions. CDC experts have developed with international partners a public health surveillance instrument for ongoing assessments of types and numbers cases of disease, injury, and other health conditions. The surveillance is being piloted in hospitals and other health facilities across Haiti.
  • Approximately 19,673 American citizens have returned to the U.S. as of midnight Jan. 31. Of these, approximately 6,786 received Administration for Children and Families (ACF)-funded services assistance, such as medical attention, food, short-term lodging, transportation or logistics for their onward flights in the United States. These services were coordinated by the state emergency repatriation team.
  • Unaccompanied children coming from Haiti who have been matched with an adoptive family but who do not yet have legal guardians are placed in the custody of the Federal government, and are the responsibility of the Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR). As of Jan. 31 at 9:00 a.m., approximately 282 unaccompanied Haitian children have been put under the care of ORR. Of these, 244 were released to sponsors and 38 unaccompanied Haitian children are being cared for at ORR-designated facilities. Sponsors are typically prospective adoptive parents who had already begun the process to adopt the child.

January 30, 2010:

  • The HHS medical teams have reported seeing more than 20,800 patients so far, including approximately 2,200 yesterday, Jan. 29.
  • Since they began seeing patients Jan 17, HHS medical teams have performed 71 surgeries and delivered 26 babies.
  • HHS currently has approximately 270 people deployed in Haiti to support relief efforts.
    • Disaster Medical Assistance Team and the International Medical Surgical Response Team continue to provide patient care using temporary medical stations set up in a soccer field near a GHESKIO clinic in Port-au-Prince. *
    • Additional teams are providing primary care at Thebaud, at the U.S. embassy, and at a Forward Operating Base in Petionville, as well as assisting with medical screening for passengers at the airport and triaging patients flown aboard the Navy hospital ship USNS Comfort.
    • Although the teams continue to treat traumatic injuries, they report seeing an increasing number of patients with chronic disease, patients who need wound care or basic care.
  • The U.S. government is making every effort to recover, identify and repatriate the remains of U.S. citizens who perished in the earthquake. An HHS Family Assistance Center (FAC) Team is working with the U.S. Department of State, the U.S. Department of Defense, and families of U.S. citizens to gather information that will help identify Americans who died so they may be reunited with their families and brought to their final resting place in the United States.
  • Public health experts from HHS Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) are participating on teams conducting rapid assessments of ongoing surveillance of health conditions in Haiti. Teams are creating snapshots of the current situation related to water safety, food supply, shelter conditions, and other health threats at over 50 sentinel surveillance sites. These data will be used to develop and prioritize immediate interventions. CDC experts have developed with international partners a public health surveillance instrument for ongoing assessments of types and numbers cases of disease, injury, and other health conditions. The surveillance is being piloted over the next week in hospitals and other health facilities across Haiti.
  • Approximately 18,964 American citizens have returned to the U.S. as of midnight Jan. 30. Of these, approximately 6,738 received Administration for Children and Families (ACF)-funded services assistance, such as medical attention, food, short-term lodging, transportation or logistics for their onward flights in the United States. These services were coordinated by the state emergency repatriation team.
  • Unaccompanied children coming from Haiti who have been matched with an adoptive family but who do not yet have legal guardians are placed in the custody of the Federal government, and are the responsibility of the Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR). As of Jan. 30 at 6:45 a.m., approximately 267 unaccompanied Haitian children have been put under the care of ORR. Of these, 179 were released to sponsors and 88 unaccompanied Haitian children are being cared for at ORR-designated facilities. Sponsors are typically prospective adoptive parents who had already begun the process to adopt the child.

January 29, 2010:

  • The HHS medical teams have reported seeing more than 18,500 patients so far, approximately 1,360 yesterday, Jan. 28.
  • Since they began seeing patients Jan 17, HHS medical teams have performed 63 surgeries and delivered 23 babies.
  • HHS currently has approximately 270 people deployed in Haiti to support relief efforts.
    • A Disaster Medical Assistance Team and the HHS International Medical Surgical Response Team continue to provide patient care using temporary medical stations set up in a soccer field near a GHESKIO clinic in Port-au-Prince.
    • Additional Disaster Medical Assistance Teams continue to provide primary care at Thebaud, at the U.S. embassy and at a Forward Operating Base in Petionville, as well as to assist with medical screening for passengers at the airport and triage patients flown aboard the Navy hospital ship USNS Comfort.
    • The teams are reporting a decrease in the number of patients with traumatic injuries, and an increasing number of patients with chronic disease, wound care or basic care.
  • Public health experts from HHS Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) are participating on teams conducting rapid assessments of ongoing surveillance of health conditions in Haiti. Teams are creating snapshots of the current situation related to water safety, food supply, shelter conditions, and other health threats at over 50 sentinel surveillance sites. These data will be used to develop and prioritize immediate interventions. CDC experts have developed with international partners a public health surveillance instrument for ongoing assessments of types and numbers cases of disease, injury, and other health conditions. The surveillance is being piloted over the next week in hospitals and other health facilities across Haiti.
  • Approximately 18,096 American citizens have returned to the U.S. as of midnight Jan. 29. Of these, approximately 6,609 received Administration for Children and Families (ACF)-funded services assistance, such as medical attention, food, short-term lodging, transportation or logistics for their onward flights in the United States. These services were coordinated by the state emergency repatriation team.
  • Children who are coming from Haiti who have been matched with an adoptive family but who do not yet have legal guardians are placed in the custody of the Federal government, and are the responsibility of the Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR). As of Jan. 29 at 9:00 a.m., approximately 200 unaccompanied Haitian children have been put under the care of ORR. Of these, 177 were released to sponsors and 23 unaccompanied Haitian children are being cared for at ORR-designated facilities. Sponsors are typically prospective adoptive parents who had already begun the process to adopt the child.

January 28, 2010:

  • The HHS medical teams have reported seeing more than 17,200 patients so far, approximately 1,870 yesterday, Jan. 27.
  • HHS currently has approximately 270 people deployed in Haiti to support relief efforts.
    • A Disaster Medical Assistance Team and the HHS International Medical Surgical Response Team continue to provide patient care using temporary medical stations set up in a soccer field near a GHESKIO clinic in Port-au-Prince.
    • Additional Disaster Medical Assistance Teams continue to provide primary care at Thebaud, at the U.S. embassy and at a Forward Operating Base in Petionville, as well as to assist with medical screening for passengers at the airport and triage patients flown aboard the Navy hospital ship USNS Comfort.
    • The teams are reporting a decrease in the number of patients with traumatic injuries, and an increasing number of patients with chronic disease, wound care or basic care.
  • Public health experts from HHS Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) are participating on teams conducting rapid assessments of and ongoing surveillance of health conditions in Haiti. Teams are creating snapshots of the current situation related to water safety, food supply, shelter conditions, and other health threats at over 50 sentinel surveillance sites. These data will be used to develop and prioritize immediate interventions. CDC experts have developed with international partners a public health surveillance instrument for ongoing assessments of types and numbers cases of disease, injury, and other health conditions. The surveillance is being piloted over the next week in hospitals and other health facilities across Haiti.
  • Approximately 16,897 American citizens have returned to the U.S. as of midnight Jan. 28. Of these, approximately 6,497 received Administration for Children and Families (ACF)-funded services assistance, such as medical attention, food, short-term lodging, transportation or logistics for their onward flights in the United States. These services were coordinated by the state emergency repatriation team.
  • Children who are coming from Haiti who have been matched with an adoptive family but who do not yet have legal guardians are placed in the custody of the Federal government, and are the responsibility of the Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR). As of Jan. 28 at 9:30 a.m., approximately 199 unaccompanied Haitian children have been put under the care of ORR. Of these, 173 were released to sponsors and 26 unaccompanied Haitian children are being cared for at ORR-designated facilities. Sponsors are typically prospective adoptive parents who had already begun the process to adopt the child.

 

January 27, 2010:

  • The HHS medical teams have reported seeing more than 15,500 patients so far, approximately 2,455 yesterday, Jan. 26. HHS has approximately 340 people deployed in Haiti to support relief efforts, although this number will return to approximately 275 when team rotations are complete this week.
  • HHS has approximately 340 people deployed in Haiti to support relief efforts, although this number will return to approximately 275 when team rotations are complete this week.
    • A Disaster Medical Assistance Team and the International Medical Surgical Response Team continue to provide patient care using temporary medical stations set up in a soccer field near a GHESKIO clinic in Port-au-Prince.
    • Additional teams are providing primary care at Thebaud, at the U.S. embassy and at a Forward Operating Base in Petionville, as well as to assist with medical screening for passengers at the airport and triage patients flown aboard the Navy hospital ship USNS Comfort.
    • Although the teams continue to treat traumatic injuries, they report seeing an increasing number of patients with chronic disease, and patients who need wound care or basic care.
  • Public health experts from HHS Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) are participating on teams conducting rapid assessments of conditions in Haiti. Information related to water safety, food supply, shelter conditions, and other health threats is being collected at 52 sentinel surveillance sites to develop and prioritize immediate interventions.
  • CDC experts are also working with USAID, US Incident Response Coordination Teams, Haitian Ministry of Health, and PAHO to develop public health surveillance instruments for ongoing assessments of types and numbers cases of disease, injury, and other health conditions. Once finalized, CDC will work with the government of Haiti and clinicians to collect data in 31 hospitals and other health facilities across Haiti.
  • Approximately 16,012 American citizens have returned to the U.S. as of midnight Jan. 27. Of these, approximately 6,319 received Administration for Children and Families (ACF)-funded services assistance, such as medical attention, food, short-term lodging, transportation or logistics for their onward flights in the United States. These services were coordinated by the state emergency repatriation team.
  • hildren who are coming from Haiti who have been matched with an adoptive family but who do not yet have legal guardians are placed in the custody of the Federal government, and are the responsibility of the Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR). As of Jan. 27 at 1:00 a.m., approximately 199 unaccompanied Haitian children have been put under the care of ORR. Of these, 134 were released to sponsors. Sponsors are typically prospective adoptive parents who had already begun the process to adopt the child. An additional 62 unaccompanied Haitian children are being cared for at ORR-designated facilities and three more children are in the process of being released to their adoptive parents.

 

January 26, 2010:

  • A Haitian male, 31 years old, was found two blocks from the Port-au-Prince Cathedral on Rue de Miracle at approximately 3:30 p.m. Jan. 26 by soldiers from the 2nd Brigade, 325th Airborne Infantry Regiment of the 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division from Fort Bragg, N.C. He was buried in the rubble for 12 days. The man had a broken leg and severe dehydration. He was evacuated to a nearby U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Disaster Medical Assistance Team for treatment.
  • HHS missions include primary care in and around the U.S. Embassy, hospital decompression and surgical augmentation, and technical assistance in public health.
    • A Disaster Medical Assistance Team and the International Medical Surgical Response Team continue to provide patient care using temporary medical stations set up in a soccer field near a GHESKIO clinic in Port-au-Prince.
    • Additional teams are assigned to provide primary care at the U.S. embassy and at a Forward Operating Base in Petionville, as well as to assist with medical screening for passengers at the airport and triage patients flown aboard the Navy hospital ship USNS Comfort.
    • The teams have reported seeing more than 11,600 patients so far, including approximately 825 yesterday, Monday, Jan. 25.
  • Public health experts from the HHS Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are coordinating with the U.S. Agency for International Development, the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) in public health efforts to support the people of Haiti.
  • The initial efforts focused on joining with national and international partners to meet urgent public health needs, and establishing liaisons and coordination needed for successful, long-range public health programs in response to the earthquake.
  • CDC staff in Haiti are working with the Haitian Ministry of Health and PAHO to do public health assessments that are mapping current health threats in Haitian communities. The assessments focus on sanitation and water, shelter and health.
  • Approximately 14,185 American citizens have returned to the U.S. as of midnight Jan. 24. Of these, approximately 5,800 received Administration for Children and Families (ACF)-funded services assistance, such as medical attention, food, short-term lodging, transportation or logistics for their onward flights in the United States. These services were coordinated by the state emergency repatriation team.

 

January 25, 2010:

  • As part of its deployment process, HHS is rotating medical teams supporting efforts in Haiti, bringing in fresh teams and sending home the teams that have been providing care in Haiti. New teams from Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Missouri, Ohio and Florida are expected to arrive this week.
  • HHS missions include primary care in and around the U.S. Embassy, hospital decompression and surgical augmentation, triage for patients awaiting transport to USNS Comfort, and technical assistance in public health.
    • A Disaster Medical Assistance Team and the International Medical Surgical Response Team are providing patient care using temporary medical stations set up in a soccer field near a GHESKIO clinic in Port-au-Prince.
    • Additional teams are using a mobile clinic at a Forward Operating Base in Petionville, providing medical screening for passengers at the airport, and providing triage for patients flown aboard USNS Comfort.
    • The teams have reported seeing more than 10,700 patients so far, including approximately 1,245 yesterday, Sunday, Jan. 24. They have performed 42 surgeries and delivered nine babies since they began providing care Jan. 17.
  • HHS public health experts from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are providing technical assistance to the Haitian government to help determine public health needs of the impacted area and how to prevent food-borne and water-borne diseases as well as other diseases seen following disasters. The goal is to help alleviate and mitigate public health issues before they become medical issues. These personnel are working with the U.N. Health Cluster to help Haiti develop a long-term reconstruction plan to build a stronger public health system than that which existed before the earthquake. In addition, CDC personnel are collaborating with international partners and the Haitian government on communication messages for the Haitian people about safety and health.

 

January 24, 2010:

  • HHS medical teams have seen more than 9,500 patients since they began providing patient care in Haiti.
  • As of 12 a.m., Jan. 24, HHS teams had performed 36 surgeries.
  • HHS teams from around the U.S. are providing medical care at several locations in and around Port au Prince
    • A Disaster Medical Assistance Team and an HHS International Medical Surgical Response Team continue to provide patient care in a soccer field near a GHESKIO clinic in Port-au-Prince.
    • Additional teams continue to provide care in and around the U.S. embassy and at a Forward Operating Base established in Petionville.
    • The first HHS medical teams deployed in response to the earthquake in Haiti are returning to Georgia, California, New Jersey, Massachusetts, and Florida. Replacement teams are coming from Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Missouri, Ohio and other areas of Florida.
    • HHS is sending a team of medical professionals through the National Disaster Medical System to Homestead Air Reserve Base in Florida to assist with the medical needs of U.S. citizens as they return from Haiti.
  • More than 13,300 American citizens have returned to the U.S. from Haiti as of 12 a.m., Jan. 24 through various ports of entry in Maryland, New Jersey, and Florida. HHS Administration for Children and Families Office of Refugee Repatriation (ORR) assessed the travelers for immediate needs and provided over 5,200 with assistance, such as medical attention, food, short-term lodging, transportation or logistics for their onward flights in the United States.

 

January 23, 2010:

  • HHS medical teams have seen more than 8,000 patients since they began providing patient care in Haiti.
  • As of midnight, Jan. 22, HHS teams had performed 30 surgeries so far and delivered 8 babies.
  • HHS teams from around the U.S. are providing medical care at several locations in and around Port au Prince
    • A Disaster Medical Assistance Team and an HHS International Medical Surgical Response Team continue to provide patient care in a soccer field near a GHESKIO clinic in Port-au-Prince.
    • DMAT team continues to provide medical support to USNS Comfort by providing care to patients prior to transfer to the ship.
    • Additional teams are providing care in and around the U.S. embassy and at a Forward Operating Base established in Petionville.
  • HHS and CDC, along with WHO and Haitian Health Ministry, launched a pilot study assessing public health risks in over 30 sentinel sites around the capital city. The study will be expanded as rapid assessment surveys.
  • More than 12,000 American citizens have returned to the U.S. from Haiti as of 12 a.m., Jan. 23 through various ports of entry in Maryland, New Jersey, and Florida. HHS Administration for Children and Families Office of Refugee Repatriation (ORR) assessed the travelers for immediate needs and provided over 11,000 with assistance, such as medical attention, food, short-term lodging, transportation or logistics for their onward flights in the United States.

January 22, 2010:

  • HHS medical teams have seen more than 7,750 patients since they began providing patient care in Haiti.
  • The most common medical conditions being treated continue to be traumatic injuries and exacerbations of chronic disease. As of midnight, Jan. 21, HHS teams had performed 25 surgeries so far and delivered six babies.
  • HHS teams from around the U.S. are providing medical care at several locations in and around Port au Prince
    • A Disaster Medical Assistance Team and an HHS International Medical Surgical Response Team continue to provide patient care in a soccer field near a GHESKIO clinic in Port-au-Prince.
    • One of our Disaster Medical Assistance Teams is at a staging facility triaging patients to be flown by helicopter for treatment aboard Comfort.
    • Additional teams are providing care in and around the U.S. embassy and at a Forward Operating Base established in Petionville.
  • More than 8,600 American citizens have returned to the U.S. from Haiti as of January 21 at 9 a.m. EST through various ports of entry in Maryland, New Jersey, and Florida. HHS Administration for Children and Families Office of Refugee Repatriation (ORR) assessed the travelers for immediate needs and provided over 3,500 with assistance, such as medical attention, food, short-term lodging, transportation or logistics for their onward flights in the United States.

 

January 21, 2010:

  • Secretary Sebelius released a statement on efforts to unite Haitian children who recently arrived in Pittsburgh with prospective parents. Click here to read the statement.
  • HHS medical teams treated approximately 2,160 patients on Jan. 20. HHS medical teams have seen more than 7,260 patients since they began providing patient care in Haiti.
  • The most common medical conditions being treated are traumatic injuries and exacerbations of chronic disease. On Jan. 20, HHS medical teams performed ten surgeries and delivered three babies in the temporary medical station set up in a soccer field near the GHESKIO clinic in Port-au-Prince.
  • HHS teams from around the U.S. are providing medical care at several locations in and around Port au Prince
    • A Disaster Medical Assistance Team and an HHS International Medical Surgical Response Team are providing patient care in a soccer field near a GHESKIO clinic in Port-au-Prince.
    • One of our Disaster Medical Assistance Teams is at a staging facility triaging patients to be flown by helicopter for treatment aboard Comfort.
    • Additional teams are providing care in and around the U.S. embassy and at a Forward Operating Base established in Petionville.
  • More than 7,230 American citizens have returned to the U.S. from Haiti as of January 20 at 9 a.m. EST through various ports of entry in Maryland, New Jersey, and Florida. HHS Administration for Children and Families Office of Refugee Repatriation (ORR) assessed the travelers for immediate needs and provided almost 3,000 with assistance, such as medical attention, food, short-term lodging, transportation or logistics for their onward flights in the United States.

 

January 20, 2010:

  • HHS medical teams had treated more than 5,000 patients since they began providing patient care in Haiti.*
  • The most common medical conditions being treated are traumatic injuries and exacerbations of chronic disease.
  • HHS teams from around the U.S. are providing medical care at several locations in and around Port au Prince
    • A Disaster Medical Assistance Team (DMAT) and a surgical team from Massachusetts are providing medical care including surgeries at site near GHESKIO clinic
    • A DMAT from Florida is providing medical care at a clinic at the U.S. Embassy
    • A DMAT team from Georgia is providing triage medical support at Port Varreaux for patients who are being transported to Comfort
    • Medical teams from California and New Jersey are providing medical support at forward operating base Gray in Petionville – this is co-located with a food and water distribution site
  • More than 5,100 Americans returning from Haiti have been assisted so far.

*The number of patients HHS medical teams have assisted has been updated as reporting has improved. An additional 1,300 patients were seen on Jan. 19.

January 19, 2010:

U.S. Department of Health and Humans Services’ (HHS) medical response teams continue to provide medical care in Haiti at several locations, including at a soccer field near a GHESKIO clinic in Port-au-Prince and at the U.S. embassy. These teams are part of the international medical response led by the United Nations that are responding to request for assistance from the Haitian government.

Approximately 265 HHS medical personnel on the ground in Haiti. These doctors, nurses, paramedics, emergency medical technicians, and other health professionals are part of the National Disaster Medical System and the U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corps. These HHS medical teams came from around the U.S., including Georgia, California, New Jersey, Massachusetts, and Florida. HHS activated the National Disaster Medical System and the U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corps to assist in Haitian earthquake relief efforts.

Current HHS missions include hospital augmentation, care at the embassy, providing an assessment to assist the Haitian government with fatality management, and providing technical assistance in public health.

HHS response updates today include:

As of Monday, Jan. 18, HHS medical teams had treated over 1800 patients since they began providing patient care in Haiti.

  • The most common medical conditions being treated are traumatic injuries and exacerbations of chronic disease.
  • More than 4,500 Americans returning from Haiti have been assisted so far.

National Disaster Medical System Teams

Currently a Disaster Medical Assistance Team and the International Medical Surgical Response Team are providing patient care using temporary medical stations set up in a soccer field near a GHESKIO clinic in Port-au-Prince. Members of another Disaster Medical Assistance Team are providing care at the embassy.

More than 300 patients were seen Jan. 17 at a Haitian orphanage, most with acute medical problems. The teams reported treating more than 1,800 people as of Monday, including delivering a baby outside the embassy on Monday and performing surgery on a child aboard USS Carl Vinson on Sunday.

Personnel from a Disaster Mortuary Operations Response Team are assessing the situation on the ground to assist to assist the Haitian government with fatality management.

Public Health Service Commissioned Corps (PHS)

An HHS Incident Response Coordination Team is coordinating the HHS response on the ground to provide medical assistance for the people of Haiti at this critical time.

Public health experts from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are providing technical assistance to the Haitian government to help determine public health needs of the impacted area and how to prevent food-borne and water-borne diseases as well as other diseases seen following disasters.

Administration for Children and Families’ Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR)

ORR continues to receive, repatriate, and provide services to American citizens being flown to the United States military bases. After the planes land, the travelers are assessed for immediate needs, including medical attention, food, short-term lodging, transportation and logistics for their onward flight in the U.S. More than 4,500 Americans returning from Haiti have been assisted so far. ORR has also assisted in uniting Haitian orphans with adoptive U.S. parents

  • CDC is collaborating with national and international partners to meet urgent public health needs and establishing liaisons and coordination needed for successful, long range public health programs in response to the earthquake.
  • CDC experts participated on Initial Rapid Assessment (IRA) teams that collected health, food, water, nutrition, and sanitation data from 224 sites across Haiti. The IRA has been completed, and CDC staff members in Haiti and Atlanta are assisting with data analysis from the IRAs. These data will be released by the U.N. and used to develop and prioritize immediate interventions.
  • CDC is collaborating with international partners to conduct needs assessments as the basis for the development of long range public health programs in Haiti. CDC staff members are assisting with surveillance of health conditions being diagnosed and treated in health facilities in Haiti. Data on communicable diseases is being collected from over 50 sites. CDC staff are working with Haitian health officials and international partners to analyze the data. Results of the surveillance are being used to prioritize public health interventions, project resources needed by health care facilities as they care for patients, and assist in long-range planning for the reconstruction of the country's health care system.
  • HHS has activated two Federal Coordinating Centers (FCCs) in Atlanta and Tampa as part of the National Disaster Medical System. These two centers are staffed by teams from the Department of Veterans Affairs who will meet NDMS medical evacuation flights from Haiti and arrange ground transport to place patients at appropriate hospitals. Federal Coordinating Centers in New York, NY; Lyons, NJ; Philadelphia, PA; Washington, DC; and Boston, MA are put on alert in case additional capacity is needed to treat patients from Haiti who have life-threatening conditions. Additional information can be found by clicking here.
  • Approximately 27,199 American citizens have returned to the U.S. from Haiti as of midnight Feb. 19. Of these, approximately 7,770 received Administration for Children and Families (ACF)-funded services assistance, such as medical attention, food, short-term lodging, transportation or logistics for their onward flights in the United States. These services were coordinated by the state emergency repatriation team.
  • Unaccompanied children coming from Haiti who have been matched with an adoptive family but who do not yet have legal guardians are placed in the custody of the Federal government, and are the responsibility of the Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR). As of Feb.19 at midnight, approximately 470 unaccompanied Haitian children have been put under the care of ORR. Of these, 448 were released to sponsors and 22 unaccompanied Haitian children are being cared for at ORR-designated facilities.* Sponsors are typically prospective adoptive parents who had already begun the process to adopt the child.

*The total number of unaccompanied Haitian children referred by DHS to ORR only reflects those children released into ORR's care. Totals reported before Feb. 8 included some unaccompanied Haitian children who were immediately released into the care of their adoptive parents upon entering the U.S.

February 18, 2010:

  • The HHS medical teams have reported seeing more than 30,453 patients so far, including approximately 359 yesterday, Feb. 17.
  • Since they began seeing patients Jan 17, HHS medical teams have performed 159 surgeries and delivered 39 babies.
  • HHS currently has approximately 142 people deployed in Haiti to support relief efforts.
    • The International Medical Surgical Response Team continues to provide patient care using temporary medical stations set up near a GHESKIO clinic in Port-au-Prince.
    • The teams report seeing patients with chronic disease or who need basic care not necessarily due to the earthquake, an indication that the medical need is returning to routine care rather than emergency care.
  • The U.S. government is working to recover, identify and repatriate the remains of U.S. citizens who perished in the earthquake.
    • A specially trained HHS Family Assistance Center (FAC) Team is working with the U.S. Dept of State and families of U.S. citizens to gather information that will help identify the remains of Americans who died in the earthquake so they can be returned to their families.
    • HHS has provided a disaster portable morgue unit at the Port-au-Prince airport, staffed with mortuary and forensic specialists who will work with the U.S. Dept. of State and U.S. Dept. of Defense to identify remains of U.S. citizens who died in the earthquake.
  • CDC is collaborating with national and international partners to meet urgent public health needs and establishing liaisons and coordination needed for successful, long range public health programs in response to the earthquake.
    • CDC experts participated on Initial Rapid Assessment (IRA) teams that collected health, food, water, nutrition, and sanitation data from 224 sites across Haiti. The IRA has been completed, and CDC staff members in Haiti and Atlanta are assisting with data analysis from the IRAs. These data will be released by the U.N. and used to develop and prioritize immediate interventions.
    • CDC is collaborating with international partners to conduct needs assessments as the basis for the development of long range public health programs in Haiti. CDC staff members are assisting with surveillance of health conditions being diagnosed and treated in health facilities in Haiti. Data on communicable diseases is being collected from over 50 sites. CDC staff are working with Haitian health officials and international partners to analyze the data. Results of the surveillance are being used to prioritize public health interventions, project resources needed by health care facilities as they care for patients, and assist in long-range planning for the reconstruction of the country's health care system.
  • HHS has activated two Federal Coordinating Centers (FCCs) in Atlanta and Tampa as part of the National Disaster Medical System. These two centers are staffed by teams from the Department of Veterans Affairs who will meet NDMS medical evacuation flights from Haiti and arrange ground transport to place patients at appropriate hospitals. Federal Coordinating Centers in New York, NY; Lyons, NJ; Philadelphia, PA; Washington, DC; and Boston, MA are put on alert in case additional capacity is needed to treat patients from Haiti who have life-threatening conditions. Additional information can be found by clicking here.
  • Approximately 26,905 American citizens have returned to the U.S. from Haiti as of midnight Feb. 18. Of these, approximately 7,495 received Administration for Children and Families (ACF)-funded services assistance, such as medical attention, food, short-term lodging, transportation or logistics for their onward flights in the United States. These services were coordinated by the state emergency repatriation team.
  • Unaccompanied children coming from Haiti who have been matched with an adoptive family but who do not yet have legal guardians are placed in the custody of the Federal government, and are the responsibility of the Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR). As of Feb.18 at midnight, approximately 469 unaccompanied Haitian children have been put under the care of ORR. Of these, 440 were released to sponsors and 29 unaccompanied Haitian children are being cared for at ORR-designated facilities.* Sponsors are typically prospective adoptive parents who had already begun the process to adopt the child.

*The total number of unaccompanied Haitian children referred by DHS to ORR only reflects those children released into ORR's care. Totals reported before Feb. 8 included some unaccompanied Haitian children who were immediately released into the care of their adoptive parents upon entering the U.S.

February 16, 2010:

  • The HHS medical teams have reported seeing more than 29,870 patients so far, including approximately 177 yesterday, Feb. 15.
  • Since they began seeing patients Jan 17, HHS medical teams have performed 151 surgeries and delivered 37 babies.
  • HHS currently has approximately 141 people deployed in Haiti to support relief efforts.
    • The International Medical Surgical Response Team continues to provide patient care using temporary medical stations set up near a GHESKIO clinic in Port-au-Prince.
    • The teams report seeing patients with chronic disease or who need basic care not necessarily due to the earthquake, an indication that the medical need is returning to routine care rather than emergency care.
  • The U.S. government is working to recover, identify and repatriate the remains of U.S. citizens who perished in the earthquake.
    • A specially trained HHS Family Assistance Center (FAC) Team is working with the U.S. Dept of State and families of U.S. citizens to gather information that will help identify the remains of Americans who died in the earthquake so they can be returned to their families.
    • HHS has provided a disaster portable morgue unit at the Port-au-Prince airport, staffed with mortuary and forensic specialists who will work with the U.S. Dept. of State and U.S. Dept. of Defense to identify remains of U.S. citizens who died in the earthquake.
  • CDC is collaborating with national and international partners to meet urgent public health needs and establishing liaisons and coordination needed for successful, long range public health programs in response to the earthquake.
    • CDC experts participated on Initial Rapid Assessment (IRA) teams that collected health, food, water, nutrition, and sanitation data from 224 sites across Haiti. The IRA has been completed, and CDC staff members in Haiti and Atlanta are assisting with data analysis from the IRAs. These data will be released by the U.N. and used to develop and prioritize immediate interventions.
    • CDC is collaborating with international partners to conduct needs assessments as the basis for the development of long range public health programs in Haiti. CDC staff members are assisting with surveillance of health conditions being diagnosed and treated in health facilities in Haiti. Data on communicable diseases is being collected from over 50 sites. , CDC staff are working with Haitian health officials and international partners to analyze the data. Results of the surveillance are being used to prioritize public health interventions, project resources needed by health care facilities as they care for patients, and assist in long-range planning for the reconstruction of the country's health care system.
  • HHS has activated two Federal Coordinating Centers (FCCs) in Atlanta and Tampa as part of the National Disaster Medical System. These two centers are staffed by teams from the Department of Veterans Affairs who will meet NDMS medical evacuation flights from Haiti and arrange ground transport to place patients at appropriate hospitals. Federal Coordinating Centers in New York, NY; Lyons, NJ; Philadelphia, PA; Washington, DC; and Boston, MA are put on alert in case additional capacity is needed to treat patients from Haiti who have life-threatening conditions. Additional information can be found by clicking here.
  • Approximately 26,471 American citizens have returned to the U.S. from Haiti as of midnight Feb. 16. Of these, approximately 7,472 received Administration for Children and Families (ACF)-funded services assistance, such as medical attention, food, short-term lodging, transportation or logistics for their onward flights in the United States. These services were coordinated by the state emergency repatriation team.
  • Unaccompanied children coming from Haiti who have been matched with an adoptive family but who do not yet have legal guardians are placed in the custody of the Federal government, and are the responsibility of the Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR). As of Feb.16 at midnight, approximately 443 unaccompanied Haitian children have been put under the care of ORR. Of these, 424 were released to sponsors and 19 unaccompanied Haitian children are being cared for at ORR-designated facilities.* Sponsors are typically prospective adoptive parents who had already begun the process to adopt the child.

*The total number of unaccompanied Haitian children referred by DHS to ORR only reflects those children released into ORR's care. Totals reported before Feb. 8 included some unaccompanied Haitian children who were immediately released into the care of their adoptive parents upon entering the U.S.

February 15, 2010:

  • The HHS medical teams have reported seeing more than 29,580 patients so far, including approximately 119 Feb. 13 and 74 on Feb. 14.
  • Since they began seeing patients Jan 17, HHS medical teams have performed 151 surgeries and delivered 37 babies.
  • HHS currently has approximately 141 people deployed in Haiti to support relief efforts.
    • The International Medical Surgical Response Team continues to provide patient care using temporary medical stations set up near a GHESKIO clinic in Port-au-Prince.
    • The teams report seeing patients with chronic disease or who need basic care not necessarily due to the earthquake, an indication that the medical need is returning to routine care rather than emergency care.
  • The U.S. government is working to recover, identify and repatriate the remains of U.S. citizens who perished in the earthquake.
    • A specially trained HHS Family Assistance Center (FAC) Team is working with the U.S. Dept of State and families of U.S. citizens to gather information that will help identify the remains of Americans who died in the earthquake so they can be returned to their families.
    • HHS has provided a disaster portable morgue unit at the Port-au-Prince airport, staffed with mortuary and forensic specialists who will work with the U.S. Dept. of State and U.S. Dept. of Defense to identify remains of U.S. citizens who died in the earthquake.
  • CDC is collaborating with national and international partners to meet urgent public health needs and establishing liaisons and coordination needed for successful, long range public health programs in response to the earthquake.
    • CDC experts participated on Initial Rapid Assessment (IRA) teams that collected health, food, water, nutrition, and sanitation data from 224 sites across Haiti. The IRA has been completed, and CDC staff members in Haiti and Atlanta are assisting with data analysis from the IRAs. These data will be released by the U.N. and used to develop and prioritize immediate interventions.
    • CDC is collaborating with international partners to conduct needs assessments as the basis for the development of long range public health programs in Haiti. CDC staff members are assisting with surveillance of health conditions being diagnosed and treated in health facilities in Haiti. Data on communicable diseases is being collected from over 50 sites. , CDC staff are working with Haitian health officials and international partners to analyze the data. Results of the surveillance are being used to prioritize public health interventions, project resources needed by health care facilities as they care for patients, and assist in long-range planning for the reconstruction of the country's health care system.
  • HHS has activated two Federal Coordinating Centers (FCCs) in Atlanta and Tampa as part of the National Disaster Medical System. These two centers are staffed by teams from the Department of Veterans Affairs who will meet NDMS medical evacuation flights from Haiti and arrange ground transport to place patients at appropriate hospitals. Federal Coordinating Centers in New York, NY; Lyons, NJ; Philadelphia, PA; Washington, DC; and Boston, MA are put on alert in case additional capacity is needed to treat patients from Haiti who have life-threatening conditions. Additional information can be found by clicking here.
  • Approximately 25,755 American citizens have returned to the U.S. from Haiti as of midnight February 14. Of these, approximately 7,460 received Administration for Children and Families (ACF)-funded services assistance, such as medical attention, food, short-term lodging, transportation or logistics for their onward flights in the United States. These services were coordinated by the state emergency repatriation team.
  • Unaccompanied children coming from Haiti who have been matched with an adoptive family but who do not yet have legal guardians are placed in the custody of the Federal government, and are the responsibility of the Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR). As of Feb.14 at midnight, approximately 443 unaccompanied Haitian children have been put under the care of ORR. Of these, 422 were released to sponsors and 21 unaccompanied Haitian children are being cared for at ORR-designated facilities.* Sponsors are typically prospective adoptive parents who had already begun the process to adopt the child.

*The total number of unaccompanied Haitian children referred by DHS to ORR only reflects those children released into ORR's care. Totals reported before Feb. 8 included some unaccompanied Haitian children who were immediately released into the care of their adoptive parents upon entering the U.S.

February 13, 2010:

  • The HHS medical teams have reported seeing more than 29,389 patients so far, including approximately 220 yesterday, Feb. 12.
  • Since they began seeing patients Jan 17, HHS medical teams have performed 151 surgeries and delivered 37 babies.
  • HHS currently has approximately 184 people deployed in Haiti to support relief efforts.
    • The International Medical Surgical Response Team continues to provide patient care using temporary medical stations set up in a soccer field near a GHESKIO clinic in Port-au-Prince.
    • The teams report seeing patients with chronic disease or who need basic care, an indication that the medical need is returning to routine care rather than emergency care.
  • The U.S. government is working to recover, identify and repatriate the remains of U.S. citizens who perished in the earthquake.
  • A specially trained HHS Family Assistance Center (FAC) Team is working with the U.S. Dept of State and families of U.S. citizens to gather information that will help identify the remains of Americans who died in the earthquake so they can be returned to their families.
  • HHS has provided a disaster portable morgue unit at the Port-au-Prince airport, staffed with mortuary and forensic specialists who will work with the U.S. Dept. of State and U.S. Dept. of Defense to identify remains of U.S. citizens who died in the earthquake.
  • CDC is collaborating with national and international partners to meet urgent public health needs and establishing liaisons and coordination needed for successful, long range public health programs in response to the earthquake.
    • CDC experts participated on Initial Rapid Assessment (IRA) teams that collected health, food, water, nutrition, and sanitation data from 224 sites across Haiti. The IRA has been completed, and CDC staff members in Haiti and Atlanta are assisting with data analysis from the IRAs. These data will be released by the U.N. and used to develop and prioritize immediate interventions.
    • CDC is collaborating with international partners to conduct needs assessments as the basis for the development of long range public health programs in Haiti. CDC staff members are assisting with surveillance of health conditions being diagnosed and treated in health facilities in Haiti. Data on communicable diseases is being collected from over 50 sites. , CDC staff are working with Haitian health officials and international partners to analyze the data. Results of the surveillance are being used to prioritize public health interventions, project resources needed by health care facilities as they care for patients, and assist in long-range planning for the reconstruction of the country's health care system.
  • HHS has activated two Federal Coordinating Centers (FCCs) in Atlanta and Tampa as part of the National Disaster Medical System. These two centers are staffed by teams from the Department of Veterans Affairs who will meet NDMS medical evacuation flights from Haiti and arrange ground transport to place patients at appropriate hospitals. Federal Coordinating Centers in New York, NY; Lyons, NJ; Philadelphia, PA; Washington, DC; and Boston, MA are put on alert in case additional capacity is needed to treat patients from Haiti who have life-threatening conditions. Additional information can be found by clicking here.
  • Approximately 25,332 American citizens have returned to the U.S. from Haiti as of midnight February 13. Of these, approximately 7,446 received Administration for Children and Families (ACF)-funded services assistance, such as medical attention, food, short-term lodging, transportation or logistics for their onward flights in the United States. These services were coordinated by the state emergency repatriation team.
  • Unaccompanied children coming from Haiti who have been matched with an adoptive family but who do not yet have legal guardians are placed in the custody of the Federal government, and are the responsibility of the Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR). As of Feb.13 at midnight, approximately 442 unaccompanied Haitian children have been put under the care of ORR. Of these, 421 were released to sponsors and 21 unaccompanied Haitian children are being cared for at ORR-designated facilities.* Sponsors are typically prospective adoptive parents who had already begun the process to adopt the child.

*The total number of unaccompanied Haitian children referred by DHS to ORR only reflects those children released into ORR's care. Totals reported before Feb. 8 included some unaccompanied Haitian children who were immediately released into the care of their adoptive parents upon entering the U.S.

February 12, 2010:

  • The HHS medical teams have reported seeing more than 29,100 patients so far, including approximately 360 yesterday, Feb. 11.
  • Since they began seeing patients Jan 17, HHS medical teams have performed 139 surgeries and delivered 33 babies.
  • HHS currently has approximately 185 people deployed in Haiti to support relief efforts.
    • The International Medical Surgical Response Team continues to provide patient care using temporary medical stations set up in a soccer field near a GHESKIO clinic in Port-au-Prince.
    • Disaster Medical Assistance Team members are providing primary care at the U.S. embassy and medical support for the recovery team at Hotel Montana.
    • The teams report seeing patients with chronic disease or who need basic care, an indication that the medical need is returning to routine care rather than emergency care.
  • The U.S. government is working to recover, identify and repatriate the remains of U.S. citizens who perished in the earthquake.
  • A specially trained HHS Family Assistance Center (FAC) Team is working with the U.S. Dept of State and families of U.S. citizens to gather information that will help identify the remains of Americans who died in the earthquake so they can be returned to their families.
  • HHS has provided a disaster portable morgue unit at the Port-au-Prince airport, staffed with mortuary and forensic specialists who will work with the U.S. Dept. of State and U.S. Dept. of Defense to identify remains of U.S. citizens who died in the earthquake.
  • CDC is collaborating with national and international partners to meet urgent public health needs and establishing liaisons and coordination needed for successful, long range public health programs in response to the earthquake.
    • CDC experts participated on Initial Rapid Assessment (IRA) teams that collected health, food, water, nutrition, and sanitation data from 224 sites across Haiti. The IRA has been completed, and CDC staff members in Haiti and Atlanta are assisting with data analysis from the IRAs. These data will be released by the U.N. and used to develop and prioritize immediate interventions.
    • CDC is collaborating with international partners to conduct needs assessments as the basis for the development of long range public health programs in Haiti. CDC staff members are assisting with surveillance of health conditions being diagnosed and treated in health facilities in Haiti. Data on communicable diseases is being collected from over 50 sites. , CDC staff are working with Haitian health officials and international partners to analyze the data. Results of the surveillance are being used to prioritize public health interventions, project resources needed by health care facilities as they care for patients, and assist in long-range planning for the reconstruction of the country's health care system.
  • HHS has activated two Federal Coordinating Centers (FCCs) in Atlanta and Tampa as part of the National Disaster Medical System. These two centers are staffed by teams from the Department of Veterans Affairs who will meet NDMS medical evacuation flights from Haiti and arrange ground transport to place patients at appropriate hospitals. Federal Coordinating Centers in New York, NY; Lyons, NJ; Philadelphia, PA; Washington, DC; and Boston, MA are put on alert in case additional capacity is needed to treat patients from Haiti who have life-threatening conditions. Additional information can be found by clicking here.
  • Approximately 25,052 American citizens have returned to the U.S. from Haiti as of midnight February 12. Of these, approximately 7,438 received Administration for Children and Families (ACF)-funded services assistance, such as medical attention, food, short-term lodging, transportation or logistics for their onward flights in the United States. These services were coordinated by the state emergency repatriation team.
  • Unaccompanied children coming from Haiti who have been matched with an adoptive family but who do not yet have legal guardians are placed in the custody of the Federal government, and are the responsibility of the Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR). As of Feb.12 at midnight, approximately 442 unaccompanied Haitian children have been put under the care of ORR. Of these, 421 were released to sponsors and 21 unaccompanied Haitian children are being cared for at ORR-designated facilities.* Sponsors are typically prospective adoptive parents who had already begun the process to adopt the child.

*The total number of unaccompanied Haitian children referred by DHS to ORR only reflects those children released into ORR's care. Totals reported before Feb. 8 included some unaccompanied Haitian children who were immediately released into the care of their adoptive parents upon entering the U.S.

February 11, 2010:

  • The HHS medical teams have reported seeing more than 28,800 patients so far, including approximately 370 yesterday, Feb. 10.
  • Since they began seeing patients Jan 17, HHS medical teams have performed 133 surgeries and delivered 32 babies.
  • HHS currently has approximately 195 people deployed in Haiti to support relief efforts.
    • The International Medical Surgical Response Team continues to provide patient care using temporary medical stations set up in a soccer field near a GHESKIO clinic in Port-au-Prince.
    • Disaster Medical Assistance Team members are providing primary care at the U.S. embassy and medical support for the recovery team at Hotel Montana.
    • The teams report seeing patients with chronic disease or who need basic care, an indication that the medical need is returning to routine care rather than emergency care.
  • The U.S. government is working to recover, identify and repatriate the remains of U.S. citizens who perished in the earthquake.
    • A specially trained HHS Family Assistance Center (FAC) Team is working with the U.S. Dept of State and families of U.S. citizens to gather information that will help identify the remains of Americans who died in the earthquake so they can be returned to their families.
    • HHS has provided a disaster portable morgue unit at the Port-au-Prince airport, staffed with mortuary and forensic specialists who will work with the U.S. Dept. of State and U.S. Dept. of Defense to identify remains of U.S. citizens who died in the earthquake.
  • CDC is collaborating with national and international partners to meet urgent public health needs and establishing liaisons and coordination needed for successful, long range public health programs in response to the earthquake.
    • CDC staff members in Haiti are helping the government of Haiti address urgent public health threats. CDC experts participated on Initial Rapid Assessment (IRA) teams to collect health, food, water, nutrition and sanitation data from 224 sites across Haiti. CDC staff in Haiti and Atlanta are assisting with data analysis from the IRAs. These data will be released by the U.N. and used to develop and prioritize immediate interventions.
    • CDC is collaborating with international partners to conduct needs assessments as the basis for the development of long range public health programs in Haiti. CDC staff members have assisted with pilot surveillance of health conditions being diagnosed and treated in 52 health facilities in Haiti. Data on communicable diseases has been collected from more than half of the 52 sites thus far and changes daily. Working with Haitian health officials and international partners, CDC staff are analyzing initial data submissions. Results of the surveillance will be used to prioritize public health interventions, project resources needed by health care facilities as they care for patients, and assist in long-range planning for the reconstruction of the country's health care system.
  • HHS has activated two Federal Coordinating Centers (FCCs) in Atlanta and Tampa as part of the National Disaster Medical System. These two centers are staffed by teams from the Department of Veterans Affairs who will meet NDMS medical evacuation flights from Haiti and arrange ground transport to place patients at appropriate hospitals. Federal Coordinating Centers in New York, NY; Lyons, NJ; Philadelphia, PA; Washington, DC; and Boston, MA are put on alert in case additional capacity is needed to treat patients from Haiti who have life-threatening conditions.  Additional information can be found by visiting our Web site.
  • Approximately 24,422 American citizens have returned to the U.S. from Haiti as of midnight February 11. Of these, approximately 7,365 received Administration for Children and Families (ACF)-funded services assistance, such as medical attention, food, short-term lodging, transportation or logistics for their onward flights in the United States. These services were coordinated by the state emergency repatriation team.
  • Unaccompanied children coming from Haiti who have been matched with an adoptive family but who do not yet have legal guardians are placed in the custody of the Federal government, and are the responsibility of the Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR).  As of Feb. 11 at midnight, approximately 436 unaccompanied Haitian children have been put under the care of ORR.  Of these, 416 were released to sponsors and 20 unaccompanied Haitian children are being cared for at ORR-designated facilities.* Sponsors are typically prospective adoptive parents who had already begun the process to adopt the child.

*The total number of unaccompanied Haitian children referred by DHS to ORR only reflects those children released into ORR's care.  Totals reported before Feb. 8 included some unaccompanied Haitian children who were immediately released into the care of their adoptive parents upon entering the U.S.

February 10, 2010:

  • The HHS medical teams have reported seeing more than 28,400 patients so far, including approximately 430 yesterday, Feb. 9.
  • Since they began seeing patients Jan 17, HHS medical teams have performed 126 surgeries and delivered 32 babies.
  • HHS currently has approximately 195 people deployed in Haiti to support relief efforts.
    • The International Medical Surgical Response Team continues to provide patient care using temporary medical stations set up in a soccer field near a GHESKIO clinic in Port-au-Prince.
    • Disaster Medical Assistance Team members are providing primary care at the U.S. embassy and medical support for the recovery team at Hotel Montana.
    • The teams report seeing patients with chronic disease or who need basic care, an indication that the medical need is returning to routine care rather than emergency care.
  • The U.S. government is working to recover, identify and repatriate the remains of U.S. citizens who perished in the earthquake.
    • A specially trained HHS Family Assistance Center (FAC) Team is working with the U.S. Dept of State and families of U.S. citizens to gather information that will help identify the remains of Americans who died in the earthquake so they can be returned to their families.
    • HHS has provided a disaster portable morgue unit at the Port-au-Prince airport, staffed with mortuary and forensic specialists who will work with the U.S. Dept. of State and U.S. Dept. of Defense to identify remains of U.S. citizens who died in the earthquake.
  • CDC is collaborating with national and international partners to meet urgent public health needs and establishing liaisons and coordination needed for successful, long range public health programs in response to the earthquake.
    • CDC staff members in Haiti are helping the government of Haiti address urgent public health threats. CDC experts participated on Initial Rapid Assessment (IRA) teams to collect health, food, water, nutrition and sanitation data from 224 sites across Haiti. CDC staff in Haiti and Atlanta are assisting with data analysis from the IRAs. These data will be released by the U.N. and used to develop and prioritize immediate interventions.
    • CDC is collaborating with international partners to conduct needs assessments as the basis for the development of long range public health programs in Haiti. CDC staff members have assisted with pilot surveillance of health conditions being diagnosed and treated in 52 health facilities in Haiti. Data on communicable diseases has been collected from about 50 percent of the 52 sites thus far and changes daily. Working with Haitian health officials and international partners, CDC staff are analyzing initial data submissions. Results of the surveillance will be used to prioritize public health interventions, project resources needed by health care facilities as they care for patients, and assist in long-range planning for the reconstruction of the country's health care system.
  • HHS has activated two Federal Coordinating Centers (FCCs) in Atlanta and Tampa as part of the National Disaster Medical System. These two centers are staffed by teams from the Department of Veterans Affairs who will meet NDMS medical evacuation flights from Haiti and arrange ground transport to place patients at appropriate hospitals. Federal Coordinating Centers in New York, NY; Lyons, NJ; Philadelphia, PA; Washington, DC; and Boston, MA are put on alert in case additional capacity is needed to treat patients from Haiti who have life-threatening conditions. Additional information can be found by visiting our Web site.
  • Approximately 23,648 American citizens have returned to the U.S. from Haiti as of midnight February 9. Of these, approximately 7,337 received Administration for Children and Families (ACF)-funded services assistance, such as medical attention, food, short-term lodging, transportation or logistics for their onward flights in the United States. These services were coordinated by the state emergency repatriation team.
  • Unaccompanied children coming from Haiti who have been matched with an adoptive family but who do not yet have legal guardians are placed in the custody of the Federal government, and are the responsibility of the Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR).  As of Feb. 9 at 9:00 a.m., approximately 364 unaccompanied Haitian children have been put under the care of ORR.  Of these, 344 were released to sponsors and 20 unaccompanied Haitian children are being cared for at ORR-designated facilities.* Sponsors are typically prospective adoptive parents who had already begun the process to adopt the child.

*The total number of unaccompanied Haitian children referred by DHS to ORR only reflects those children released into ORR's care.  Totals reported before Feb. 8 included some unaccompanied Haitian children who were immediately released into the care of their adoptive parents upon entering the U.S.

February 9, 2010:

  • The HHS medical teams have reported seeing more than 27,900 patients so far, including approximately 600 yesterday, Feb. 8.
  • Since they began seeing patients Jan 17, HHS medical teams have performed 122 surgeries and delivered 31 babies.
  • HHS currently has approximately 195 people deployed in Haiti to support relief efforts.
    • The International Medical Surgical Response Team continues to provide patient care using temporary medical stations set up in a soccer field near a GHESKIO clinic in Port-au-Prince.
    • Disaster Medical Assistance Team members are providing primary care at the U.S. embassy and medical support for the recovery team at Hotel Montana.
    • The teams report seeing patients with chronic disease or who need basic care, an indication that the medical need is returning to routine care rather than emergency care.
  • The U.S. government is working to recover, identify and repatriate the remains of U.S. citizens who perished in the earthquake.
    • A specially trained HHS Family Assistance Center (FAC) Team is working with the U.S. Dept of State and families of U.S. citizens to gather information that will help identify the remains of Americans who died in the earthquake so they can be returned to their families.
    • HHS has provided a disaster portable morgue unit at the Port-au-Prince airport, staffed with mortuary and forensic specialists who will work with the U.S. Dept. of State and U.S. Dept. of Defense to identify remains of U.S. citizens who died in the earthquake.
  • CDC is collaborating with national and international partners to meet urgent public health needs and establishing liaisons and coordination needed for successful, long range public health programs in response to the earthquake.
    • CDC staff members in Haiti are helping the government of Haiti address urgent public health threats. CDC experts participated on Initial Rapid Assessment (IRA) teams to collect health, food, water, nutrition and sanitation data from 224 sites across Haiti. CDC staff in Haiti and Atlanta are assisting with data analysis from the IRAs. These data will be released by the U.N. and used to develop and prioritize immediate interventions.
    • CDC is collaborating with international partners to conduct needs assessments as the basis for the development of long range public health programs in Haiti. CDC staff members have assisted with pilot surveillance of health conditions being diagnosed and treated in 52 health facilities in Haiti. Data on communicable diseases has been collected from about 50 percent of the 52 sites thus far and changes daily. Working with Haitian health officials and international partners, CDC staff are analyzing initial data submissions. Results of the surveillance will be used to prioritize public health interventions, project resources needed by health care facilities as they care for patients, and assist in long-range planning for the reconstruction of the country's health care system.
  • HHS has activated two Federal Coordinating Centers (FCCs) in Atlanta and Tampa as part of the National Disaster Medical System. These two centers are staffed by teams from the Department of Veterans Affairs who will meet NDMS medical evacuation flights from Haiti and arrange ground transport to place patients at appropriate hospitals. Federal Coordinating Centers in New York, NY; Lyons, NJ; Philadelphia, PA; Washington, DC; and Boston, MA are put on alert in case additional capacity is needed to treat patients from Haiti who have life-threatening conditions. Additional information can be found by visiting our Web site.
  • Approximately 23,648 American citizens have returned to the U.S. from Haiti as of midnight February 9. Of these, approximately 7,337 received Administration for Children and Families (ACF)-funded services assistance, such as medical attention, food, short-term lodging, transportation or logistics for their onward flights in the United States. These services were coordinated by the state emergency repatriation team.
  • Unaccompanied children coming from Haiti who have been matched with an adoptive family but who do not yet have legal guardians are placed in the custody of the Federal government, and are the responsibility of the Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR). As of Feb. 9 at 9:00 a.m., approximately 364 unaccompanied Haitian children have been put under the care of ORR. Of these, 344 were released to sponsors and 20 unaccompanied Haitian children are being cared for at ORR-designated facilities.* Sponsors are typically prospective adoptive parents who had already begun the process to adopt the child.

*The total number of unaccompanied Haitian children referred by DHS to ORR only reflects those children released into ORR's care. Totals reported before Feb. 8 included some unaccompanied Haitian children who were immediately released into the care of their adoptive parents upon entering the U.S.

February 8, 2010:

  • The HHS medical teams have reported seeing more than 27,390 patients so far, including approximately 390 yesterday, Feb. 7.
  • Since they began seeing patients Jan 17, HHS medical teams have performed 117 surgeries and delivered 31 babies.
  • HHS currently has approximately 200 people deployed in Haiti to support relief efforts.
    • The International Medical Surgical Response Team continues to provide patient care using temporary medical stations set up in a soccer field near a GHESKIO clinic in Port-au-Prince.
    • Disaster Medical Assistance Team members are providing primary care at the U.S. embassy and medical support for the recovery team at Hotel Montana.
    • The teams report seeing patients with chronic disease or who need basic care, an indication that the medical need is returning to routine care rather than emergency care.
  • The U.S. government is working to recover, identify and repatriate the remains of U.S. citizens who perished in the earthquake.
    • A specially trained HHS Family Assistance Center (FAC) Team is working with the U.S. Dept of State and families of U.S. citizens to gather information that will help identify the remains of Americans who died in the earthquake so they can be returned to their families.
    • HHS has provided a disaster portable morgue unit at the Port-au-Prince airport, staffed with mortuary and forensic specialists who will work with the U.S. Dept. of State and U.S. Dept. of Defense to identify remains of U.S. citizens who died in the earthquake.
  • CDC is collaborating with national and international partners to meet urgent public health needs and establishing liaisons and coordination needed for successful, long range public health programs in response to the earthquake.
    • CDC staff members in Haiti are helping the government of Haiti address urgent public health threats. CDC experts participated on Initial Rapid Assessment (IRA) teams to collect health, food, water, nutrition and sanitation data from 224 sites across Haiti. CDC staff in Haiti and Atlanta are assisting with data analysis from the IRAs. These data will be released by the U.N. and used to develop and prioritize immediate interventions.
    • CDC is collaborating with international partners to conduct needs assessments as the basis for the development of long range public health programs in Haiti. CDC staff members have assisted with pilot surveillance of health conditions being diagnosed and treated in 52 health facilities in Haiti. Data on communicable diseases has been collected from about 50 percent of the 52 sites thus far and changes daily. Working with Haitian health officials and international partners, CDC staff are analyzing initial data submissions. Results of the surveillance will be used to prioritize public health interventions, project resources needed by health care facilities as they care for patients, and assist in long-range planning for the reconstruction of the country's health care system.
  • HHS has activated two Federal Coordinating Centers (FCCs) in Atlanta and Tampa as part of the National Disaster Medical System. These two centers are staffed by teams from the Department of Veterans Affairs who will meet NDMS medical evacuation flights from Haiti and arrange ground transport to place patients at appropriate hospitals. Federal Coordinating Centers in New York, NY; Lyons, NJ; Philadelphia, PA; Washington, DC; and Boston, MA are put on alert in case additional capacity is needed to treat patients from Haiti who have life-threatening conditions.  Additional information can be found by visiting our Web site.
  • Approximately 23,433 American citizens have returned to the U.S. from Haiti as of midnight February 8. Of these, approximately 7,324 received Administration for Children and Families (ACF)-funded services assistance, such as medical attention, food, short-term lodging, transportation or logistics for their onward flights in the United States. These services were coordinated by the state emergency repatriation team.
  • Unaccompanied children coming from Haiti who have been matched with an adoptive family but who do not yet have legal guardians are placed in the custody of the Federal government, and are the responsibility of the Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR). As of Feb. 8 at 9:00 a.m., approximately 364 unaccompanied Haitian children have been put under the care of ORR. Of these, 341 were released to sponsors and 23 unaccompanied Haitian children are being cared for at ORR-designated facilities.* Sponsors are typically prospective adoptive parents who had already begun the process to adopt the child.

*As of today, the total number of unaccompanied Haitian children referred by DHS to ORR only reflect those children released into ORR's care. Previous totals included some unaccompanied Haitian children who were immediately released into the care of their adoptive parents upon entering the U.S.

February 7, 2010:

  • The HHS medical teams have reported seeing more than 27,000 patients so far, including approximately 450 yesterday, Feb. 6.
  • Since they began seeing patients Jan 17, HHS medical teams have performed 115 surgeries and delivered 31 babies.
  • HHS currently has approximately 200 people deployed in Haiti to support relief efforts.
    • The International Medical Surgical Response Team continues to provide patient care using temporary medical stations set up in a soccer field near a GHESKIO clinic in Port-au-Prince.
    • Disaster Medical Assistance Team members are providing primary care at the U.S. embassy and medical support for the recovery team at Hotel Montana.
    • The teams report seeing patients with chronic disease or who need basic care, an indication that the medical need is returning to routine care rather than emergency care.
  • The U.S. government is working to recover, identify and repatriate the remains of U.S. citizens who perished in the earthquake.
    • A specially trained HHS Family Assistance Center (FAC) Team is working with the U.S. Dept of State and families of U.S. citizens to gather information that will help identify the remains of Americans who died in the earthquake so they can be returned to their families.
    • HHS has provided a disaster portable morgue unit at the Port-au-Prince airport, staffed with mortuary and forensic specialists who will work with the U.S. Dept. of State and U.S. Dept. of Defense to identify remains of U.S. citizens who died in the earthquake.
  • CDC is collaborating with national and international partners to meet urgent public health needs and establishing liaisons and coordination needed for successful, long range public health programs in response to the earthquake.
    • CDC staff members in Haiti are helping the government of Haiti address urgent public health threats. CDC experts participated on Initial Rapid Assessment (IRA) teams to collect health, food, water, nutrition and sanitation data from sites across Haiti. CDC staff in Haiti and Atlanta are assisting with data analysis from the IRAs. These data will be released by the U.N. and used to develop and prioritize immediate interventions.
    • CDC is collaborating with international partners to conduct needs assessments as the basis for the development of long range public health programs in Haiti. CDC staff members have assisted with pilot surveillance of health conditions being diagnosed and treated in 52 health facilities in Haiti. Initial reports have been received from 22 of the health facilities among the sentinel sites. Working with Haitian health officials and international partners, CDC staff are analyzing initial data submissions. Results of the surveillance will be used to prioritize public health interventions, project resources needed by health care facilities as they care for patients, and assist in long-range planning for the reconstruction of the country's health care system.
  • HHS has activated two Federal Coordinating Centers (FCCs) in Atlanta and Tampa as part of the National Disaster Medical System. These two centers are staffed by teams from the Department of Veterans Affairs who will meet NDMS medical evacuation flights from Haiti and arrange ground transport to place patients at appropriate hospitals. Federal Coordinating Centers in New York, NY; Lyons, NJ; Philadelphia, PA; Washington, DC; and Boston, MA are put on alert in case additional capacity is needed to treat patients from Haiti who have life-threatening conditions. Additional information can be found by visiting our Web site.
  • Approximately 23,019 American citizens have returned to the U.S. from Haiti as of midnight February 7. Of these, approximately 7,180 received Administration for Children and Families (ACF)-funded services assistance, such as medical attention, food, short-term lodging, transportation or logistics for their onward flights in the United States. These services were coordinated by the state emergency repatriation team.
  • Unaccompanied children coming from Haiti who have been matched with an adoptive family but who do not yet have legal guardians are placed in the custody of the Federal government, and are the responsibility of the Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR). As of Feb. 4 at 9:00 a.m., approximately 372 unaccompanied Haitian children have been put under the care of ORR. Of these, 312 were released to sponsors and 60 unaccompanied Haitian children are being cared for at ORR-designated facilities. Sponsors are typically prospective adoptive parents who had already begun the process to adopt the child.

February 6, 2010:

  • The HHS medical teams have reported seeing more than 26,500 patients so far, including approximately 350 yesterday, Feb. 5.
  • Since they began seeing patients Jan 17, HHS medical teams have performed 112 surgeries and delivered 31 babies.
  • HHS currently has approximately 200 people deployed in Haiti to support relief efforts.
    • The International Medical Surgical Response Team continues to provide patient care using temporary medical stations set up in a soccer field near a GHESKIO clinic in Port-au-Prince.
    • Disaster Medical Assistance Team members are providing primary care at the U.S. embassy and medical support for the recovery team at Hotel Montana.
    • The teams report seeing patients with chronic disease or who need basic care, an indication that the medical need is returning to routine care rather than emergency care.
  • The U.S. government is working to recover, identify and repatriate the remains of U.S. citizens who perished in the earthquake.
    • A specially trained HHS Family Assistance Center (FAC) Team is working with the U.S. Dept of State and families of U.S. citizens to gather information that will help identify the remains of Americans who died in the earthquake so they can be returned to their families.
    • HHS has provided a disaster portable morgue unit at the Port-au-Prince airport, staffed with mortuary and forensic specialists who will work with the U.S. Dept. of State and U.S. Dept. of Defense to identify remains of U.S. citizens who died in the earthquake.
  • Public health experts from the HHS Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are working with the Haitian Ministry of Health and the Pan American Health Organization on public health assessment teams to identify health threats.
    • CDC is working with the Haiti National Laboratory to reconstruct the lab and maintain contact with more than 50 sentinel sites, collating and entering data, analyzing and reporting.
    • CDC staff members in Haiti are working with the public health assessment teams that are mapping health threats Haiti now faces, so that donated resources can be directed to areas where they can be used most effectively.
  • HHS has activated two Federal Coordinating Centers (FCCs) in Atlanta and Tampa as part of the National Disaster Medical System. These two centers are staffed by teams from the Department of Veterans Affairs who will meet NDMS medical evacuation flights from Haiti and arrange ground transport to place patients at appropriate hospitals. Federal Coordinating Centers in New York, NY; Lyons, NJ; Philadelphia, PA; Washington, DC; and Boston, MA are put on alert in case additional capacity is needed to treat patients from Haiti who have life-threatening conditions. Additional information can be found by visiting our Web site.
  • Approximately 21,406 American citizens have returned to the U.S. from Haiti as of midnight February 5. Of these, approximately 7,033 received Administration for Children and Families (ACF)-funded services assistance, such as medical attention, food, short-term lodging, transportation or logistics for their onward flights in the United States. These services were coordinated by the state emergency repatriation team.
  • Unaccompanied children coming from Haiti who have been matched with an adoptive family but who do not yet have legal guardians are placed in the custody of the Federal government, and are the responsibility of the Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR). As of Feb. 4 at 9:00 a.m., approximately 372 unaccompanied Haitian children have been put under the care of ORR. Of these, 312 were released to sponsors and 60 unaccompanied Haitian children are being cared for at ORR-designated facilities. Sponsors are typically prospective adoptive parents who had already begun the process to adopt the child.

February 5, 2010:

  • The HHS medical teams have reported seeing more than 26,100 patients so far, including approximately 390 yesterday, Feb. 4.
  • Since they began seeing patients Jan. 17, HHS medical teams have performed 111 surgeries and delivered 31 babies.
  • HHS currently has approximately 275 people deployed in Haiti to support relief efforts.
    • The International Medical Surgical Response Team continues to provide patient care using temporary medical stations set up in a soccer field near a GHESKIO clinic in Port-au-Prince.
    • Disaster Medical Assistance Team members are providing primary care at the U.S. embassy and medical support for the recovery team at Hotel Montana.
    • The teams report seeing patients with chronic disease or who need basic care indicating that the medical need is returning to routine care rather than emergency care.
  • The U.S. government is working to recover, identify and repatriate the remains of U.S. citizens who perished in the earthquake.
    • A specially trained HHS Family Assistance Center (FAC) Team is working with the U.S. Dept of State and families of U.S. citizens to gather information that will help identify the remains of Americans who died in the earthquake so they can be returned to their families.
    • HHS has provided a disaster portable morgue unit at the Port-au-Prince airport, staffed with mortuary and forensic specialists who will work with the U.S. Dept. of State and U.S. Dept. of Defense to identify remains of U.S. citizens who died in the earthquake.
  • Public health experts from the HHS Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are working with the Haitian Ministry of Health and the Pan American Health Organization on public health assessment teams to identify health threats.
    • CDC is working with the Haiti National Laboratory to reconstruct the lab and maintain contact with more than 50 sentinel sites, collating and entering data, analyzing and reporting.
    • CDC staff members in Haiti are working with the public health assessment teams that are mapping health threats Haiti now faces, so that donated resources can be directed to areas where they can be used most effectively.
  • HHS has activated two Federal Coordinating Centers (FCCs) in Atlanta and Tampa as part of the National Disaster Medical System. These two centers are staffed by teams from the Department of Veterans Affairs who will meet NDMS medical evacuation flights from Haiti and arrange ground transport to place patients at appropriate hospitals. Federal Coordinating Centers in New York, NY; Lyons, NJ; Philadelphia, PA; Washington, DC; and Boston, MA are put on alert in case additional capacity is needed to treat patients from Haiti who have life-threatening conditions. Additional information can be found by visiting our Web site.
  • Approximately 21,406 American citizens have returned to the U.S. from Haiti as of midnight February 5. Of these, approximately 7,033 received Administration for Children and Families (ACF)-funded services assistance, such as medical attention, food, short-term lodging, transportation or logistics for their onward flights in the United States. These services were coordinated by the state emergency repatriation team.
  • Unaccompanied children coming from Haiti who have been matched with an adoptive family but who do not yet have legal guardians are placed in the custody of the Federal government, and are the responsibility of the Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR). As of Feb. 4 at 9:00 a.m., approximately 372 unaccompanied Haitian children have been put under the care of ORR. Of these, 312 were released to sponsors and 60 unaccompanied Haitian children are being cared for at ORR-designated facilities. Sponsors are typically prospective adoptive parents who had already begun the process to adopt the child.

February 4, 2010:

  • The HHS medical teams have reported seeing more than 25,800 patients so far, including approximately 440 yesterday, Feb. 3.
  • Since they began seeing patients Jan 17, HHS medical teams have performed 108 surgeries and delivered 30 babies.
  • HHS currently has approximately 275 people deployed in Haiti to support relief efforts.
    • The HHS teams report seeing patients with chronic disease or who need basic care and fewer patients with traumatic injuries.
    • A Disaster Medical Assistance Team and the International Medical Surgical Response Team continue to provide patient care using temporary medical stations set up in a soccer field near a GHESKIO clinic in Port-au-Prince.
    • Additional teams are providing care at the U.S. embassy, and the Love-a-Child facility in Fond Parisien.  Teams are also assisting with medical screening for passengers at the airport and providing medical support for the recovery team at Hotel Montana.
  • The U.S. government is making every effort to working to recover, identify and repatriate the remains of U.S. citizens who perished in the earthquake.
    • A specially trained HHS Family Assistance Center (FAC) Team is working with the U.S. Dept of State and families of U.S. citizens to gather information that will help identify the remains of Americans who died in the earthquake so they can be returned to their families.
    • HHS has provided a disaster portable morgue unit at the Port-au-Prince airport, staffed with mortuary and forensic specialists who will work with the U.S. Dept. of State and U.S. Dept. of Defense to identify remains of U.S. citizens who died in the earthquake.
  • Public health experts from the HHS Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are working with the Haitian Ministry of Health and the Pan American Health Organization on public health assessment teams to identify health threats.
    • CDC is working with the Haiti National Laboratory to reconstruct the lab and maintain contact with 52 sentinel sites, collating and entering data, analyzing and reporting.
    • CDC staff members in Haiti are working with the public health assessment teams that are mapping health threats Haiti now faces, so that donated resources can be directed to areas where they can be used most effectively.
  • HHS has activated two Federal Coordinating Centers (FCCs) in Atlanta and Tampa as part of the National Disaster Medical System. These two centers are staffed by teams from the Department of Veterans Affairs who will meet NDMS medical evacuation flights from Haiti and arrange ground transport to place patients at appropriate hospitals. Federal Coordinating Centers in New York, NY; Lyons, NJ; Philadelphia, PA; Washington, DC; and Boston, MA are put on alert in case additional capacity is needed to treat patients from Haiti who have life-threatening conditions.  Additional information can be found by visiting our Web site.
  • Approximately 21,163 American citizens have returned to the U.S. from Haiti as of midnight February 4. Of these, approximately 6,990 received Administration for Children and Families (ACF)-funded services assistance, such as medical attention, food, short-term lodging, transportation or logistics for their onward flights in the United States. These services were coordinated by the state emergency repatriation team.
  • Unaccompanied children coming from Haiti who have been matched with an adoptive family but who do not yet have legal guardians are placed in the custody of the Federal government, and are the responsibility of the Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR).  As of Feb. 4 at 9:00 a.m., approximately 372 unaccompanied Haitian children have been put under the care of ORR.  Of these, 312 were released to sponsors and 60 unaccompanied Haitian children are being cared for at ORR-designated facilities.  Sponsors are typically prospective adoptive parents who had already begun the process to adopt the child.  

February 3, 2010:

  • The HHS medical teams have reported seeing more than 25,300 patients so far, including approximately 700 yesterday, Feb. 2.
  • Since they began seeing patients Jan 17, HHS medical teams have performed 106 surgeries and delivered 29 babies.
  • HHS currently has approximately 275 people deployed in Haiti to support relief efforts.
    • A Disaster Medical Assistance Team and the International Medical Surgical Response Team continue to provide patient care using temporary medical stations set up in a soccer field near a GHESKIO clinic in Port-au-Prince.
    • Additional teams are providing care at the U.S. embassy, and the Love-a-Child facility in Fond Parisien. Teams are also assisting with medical screening for passengers at the airport.
  • HHS is providing approximately 30 tons of medical equipment to USAID for use in a facility where patients treated aboard the U.S. Navy’s hospital ship, the USNS Comfort, can be moved to receive aftercare. This 250-bed interim aftercare facility will allow more patients to receive critical and comprehensive post-operative medical care and will free up much needed medical treatment space on the USNS Comfort.
  • The U.S. government is making every effort to recover, identify and repatriate the remains of U.S. citizens who perished in the earthquake. An HHS Family Assistance Center (FAC) Team is working with the U.S. Department of State, the U.S. Department of Defense, and families of U.S. citizens to gather information that will help identify Americans who died so they may be reunited with their families and brought to their final resting place in the United States. For more information on the Family Assistance Center.
  • HHS has provided a disaster portable morgue unit at the Port-au-Prince airport, staffed with mortuary and forensic specialists who will work with the U.S. Dept. of State and U.S. Dept. of Defense to identify remains of U.S. citizens who died in the earthquake.
  • Public health experts from HHS Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) are participating on teams conducting rapid assessments of ongoing surveillance of health conditions in Haiti. Teams are creating snapshots of the current situation related to water safety, food supply, shelter conditions, and other health threats at more than 50 sentinel surveillance sites. These data will be used to develop and prioritize immediate interventions. CDC experts have developed with international partners a public health surveillance instrument for ongoing assessments of types and numbers cases of disease, injury, and other health conditions. The surveillance is being piloted in hospitals and other health facilities across Haiti.
  • HHS has activated two Federal Coordinating Centers (FCCs) in Atlanta and Tampa as part of the National Disaster Medical System. These two centers are staffed by teams from the Department of Veterans Affairs who will meet NDMS medical evacuation flights from Haiti and arrange ground transport to place patients at appropriate hospitals. Federal Coordinating Centers in New York, NY; Lyons, NJ; Philadelphia, PA; Washington, DC; and Boston, MA are put on alert in case additional capacity is needed to treat patients from Haiti who have life-threatening conditions. Additional information can be found by visiting our Web site.
  • Approximately 20,774 American citizens have returned to the U.S. as of midnight February 3. Of these, approximately 6,948 received Administration for Children and Families (ACF)-funded services assistance, such as medical attention, food, short-term lodging, transportation or logistics for their onward flights in the United States. These services were coordinated by the state emergency repatriation team.
  • Unaccompanied children coming from Haiti who have been matched with an adoptive family but who do not yet have legal guardians are placed in the custody of the Federal government, and are the responsibility of the Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR). As of Feb. 3 at 9:00 a.m., approximately 328 unaccompanied Haitian children have been put under the care of ORR. Of these, 271 were released to sponsors and 57 unaccompanied Haitian children are being cared for at ORR-designated facilities. Sponsors are typically prospective adoptive parents who had already begun the process to adopt the child.

February 2, 2010:

  • The HHS medical teams have reported seeing more than 24,500 patients so far, including approximately 1,300 yesterday, Feb. 1.
  • Since they began seeing patients Jan 17, HHS medical teams have performed more than 100 surgeries and delivered 28 babies.
  • HHS currently has approximately 275 people deployed in Haiti to support relief efforts.
    • A Disaster Medical Assistance Team and the International Medical Surgical Response Team continue to provide patient care using temporary medical stations set up in a soccer field near a GHESKIO clinic in Port-au-Prince.
    • Additional teams are providing primary care at Thebaud, at the U.S. embassy, and the Love-a-Child facility in Port-au-Prince. Teams are also assisting with medical screening for passengers at the airport.
  • HHS is providing approximately 30 tons of medical equipment to USAID for use in a facility where patients treated aboard the U.S. Navy’s hospital ship, the USNS Comfort, can be moved to receive aftercare. This will help providing continuous care for patients and will free up much needed medical treatment space on the USNS Comfort.
  • The U.S. government is making every effort to recover, identify and repatriate the remains of U.S. citizens who perished in the earthquake. An HHS Family Assistance Center (FAC) Team is working with the U.S. Department of State, the U.S. Department of Defense, and families of U.S. citizens to gather information that will help identify Americans who died so they may be reunited with their families and brought to their final resting place in the United States. For more information on the Family Assistance Center.
  • Public health experts from HHS Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) are participating on teams conducting rapid assessments of ongoing surveillance of health conditions in Haiti. Teams are creating snapshots of the current situation related to water safety, food supply, shelter conditions, and other health threats at more than 50 sentinel surveillance sites. These data will be used to develop and prioritize immediate interventions. CDC experts have developed with international partners a public health surveillance instrument for ongoing assessments of types and numbers cases of disease, injury, and other health conditions. The surveillance is being piloted in hospitals and other health facilities across Haiti.
  • As part of the ongoing medical response to the Haiti earthquake, HHS is utilizing additional components of the National Disaster Medical System (NDMS) to help U.S. hospitals provide care to critically ill survivors.
  • HHS will use the National Disaster Medical System (NDMS) to reimburse participating hospitals for care provided to American and Haitian patients evacuated with life-threatening injuries due to the earthquake.
  • Haitian and American patients will be referred by Haitian hospitals, NGOs, USNS Comfort, or other facilities if they meet criteria for evacuation. Evacuations are being reserved for the patients with life-threatening conditions that cannot be handled within Haiti. There must also be a reasonable chance that the patient can survive the flight and the treatment in the U.S.
  • Hospitals that participate in the NDMS can receive federal reimbursement at 110% of Medicare rates for costs they incur in treating these patients. Hospitals are eligible for reimbursement only for patients who, before leaving Haiti, have gone through the NDMS medical screening process and meet the evacuation criteria.
  • HHS has activated two Federal Coordinating Centers (FCCs) in Atlanta and Tampa. These two centers are staffed by teams from the Department of Veterans Affairs who will meet the flights and arrange ground transport to appropriate hospitals.
  • Approximately 20,374 American citizens have returned to the U.S. as of midnight February 2. Of these, approximately 6,917 received Administration for Children and Families (ACF)-funded services assistance, such as medical attention, food, short-term lodging, transportation or logistics for their onward flights in the United States. These services were coordinated by the state emergency repatriation team.
  • Unaccompanied children coming from Haiti who have been matched with an adoptive family but who do not yet have legal guardians are placed in the custody of the Federal government, and are the responsibility of the Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR). As of Feb. 2 at 9:00 a.m., approximately 289 unaccompanied Haitian children have been put under the care of ORR. Of these, 265 were released to sponsors and 24 unaccompanied Haitian children are being cared for at ORR-designated facilities. Sponsors are typically prospective adoptive parents who had already begun the process to adopt the child.

February 1, 2010:

  • The HHS medical teams have reported seeing more than 23,200 patients so far, including approximately 975 yesterday, Jan. 31.
  • Since they began seeing patients Jan 17, HHS medical teams have performed 98 surgeries and delivered 28 babies.
  • HHS currently has approximately 275 people deployed in Haiti to support relief efforts.
    • A Disaster Medical Assistance Team and the International Medical Surgical Response Team continue to provide patient care using temporary medical stations set up in a soccer field near a GHESKIO clinic in Port-au-Prince.
    • Additional teams are providing primary care at Thebaud, at the U.S. embassy, and at a Forward Operating Base in Petionville, as well as assisting with medical screening for passengers at the airport and triaging patients flown aboard the Navy hospital ship USNS Comfort.
    • Although the teams continue to treat traumatic injuries, they report seeing an increasing number of patients with chronic disease, patients who need wound care or basic care.
  • The U.S. government is making every effort to recover, identify and repatriate the remains of U.S. citizens who perished in the earthquake. An HHS Family Assistance Center (FAC) Team is working with the U.S. Department of State, the U.S. Department of Defense, and families of U.S. citizens to gather information that will help identify Americans who died so they may be reunited with their families and brought to their final resting place in the United States. For more information on the Family Assistance Center.
  • Public health experts from HHS Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) are participating on teams conducting rapid assessments of ongoing surveillance of health conditions in Haiti. Teams are creating snapshots of the current situation related to water safety, food supply, shelter conditions, and other health threats at 51 sentinel surveillance sites. These data will be used to develop and prioritize immediate interventions. CDC experts have developed with international partners a public health surveillance instrument for ongoing assessments of types and numbers cases of disease, injury, and other health conditions. The surveillance is being piloted in hospitals and other health facilities across Haiti.
  • Approximately 20,041 American citizens have returned to the U.S. as of midnight February 1. Of these, approximately 6,912 received Administration for Children and Families (ACF)-funded services assistance, such as medical attention, food, short-term lodging, transportation or logistics for their onward flights in the United States. These services were coordinated by the state emergency repatriation team.
  • Unaccompanied children coming from Haiti who have been matched with an adoptive family but who do not yet have legal guardians are placed in the custody of the Federal government, and are the responsibility of the Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR). As of February 1 at 9:00 a.m., approximately 289 unaccompanied Haitian children have been put under the care of ORR. Of these, 265 were released to sponsors and 24 unaccompanied Haitian children are being cared for at ORR-designated facilities. Sponsors are typically prospective adoptive parents who had already begun the process to adopt the child.

January 31, 2010:

  • The HHS medical teams have reported seeing more than 22,200 patients so far, including approximately 1,450 yesterday, Jan. 30.
  • Since they began seeing patients Jan 17, HHS medical teams have performed 84 surgeries and delivered 28 babies.
  • HHS currently has approximately 270 people deployed in Haiti to support relief efforts.
    • A Disaster Medical Assistance Team and the International Medical Surgical Response Team continue to provide patient care using temporary medical stations set up in a soccer field near a GHESKIO clinic in Port-au-Prince.
    • Additional teams are providing primary care at Thebaud, at the U.S. embassy, and at a Forward Operating Base in Petionville, as well as assisting with medical screening for passengers at the airport and triaging patients flown aboard the Navy hospital ship USNS Comfort.
    • Although the teams continue to treat traumatic injuries, they report seeing an increasing number of patients with chronic disease, patients who need wound care or basic care.
  • The U.S. government is making every effort to recover, identify and repatriate the remains of U.S. citizens who perished in the earthquake. An HHS Family Assistance Center (FAC) Team is working with the U.S. Department of State, the U.S. Department of Defense, and families of U.S. citizens to gather information that will help identify Americans who died so they may be reunited with their families and brought to their final resting place in the United States. For more information on the Family Assistance Center.
  • Public health experts from HHS Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) are participating on teams conducting rapid assessments of ongoing surveillance of health conditions in Haiti. Teams are creating snapshots of the current situation related to water safety, food supply, shelter conditions, and other health threats at over 50 sentinel surveillance sites. These data will be used to develop and prioritize immediate interventions. CDC experts have developed with international partners a public health surveillance instrument for ongoing assessments of types and numbers cases of disease, injury, and other health conditions. The surveillance is being piloted in hospitals and other health facilities across Haiti.
  • Approximately 19,673 American citizens have returned to the U.S. as of midnight Jan. 31. Of these, approximately 6,786 received Administration for Children and Families (ACF)-funded services assistance, such as medical attention, food, short-term lodging, transportation or logistics for their onward flights in the United States. These services were coordinated by the state emergency repatriation team.
  • Unaccompanied children coming from Haiti who have been matched with an adoptive family but who do not yet have legal guardians are placed in the custody of the Federal government, and are the responsibility of the Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR). As of Jan. 31 at 9:00 a.m., approximately 282 unaccompanied Haitian children have been put under the care of ORR. Of these, 244 were released to sponsors and 38 unaccompanied Haitian children are being cared for at ORR-designated facilities. Sponsors are typically prospective adoptive parents who had already begun the process to adopt the child.

January 30, 2010:

  • The HHS medical teams have reported seeing more than 20,800 patients so far, including approximately 2,200 yesterday, Jan. 29.
  • Since they began seeing patients Jan 17, HHS medical teams have performed 71 surgeries and delivered 26 babies.
  • HHS currently has approximately 270 people deployed in Haiti to support relief efforts.
    • Disaster Medical Assistance Team and the International Medical Surgical Response Team continue to provide patient care using temporary medical stations set up in a soccer field near a GHESKIO clinic in Port-au-Prince. *
    • Additional teams are providing primary care at Thebaud, at the U.S. embassy, and at a Forward Operating Base in Petionville, as well as assisting with medical screening for passengers at the airport and triaging patients flown aboard the Navy hospital ship USNS Comfort.
    • Although the teams continue to treat traumatic injuries, they report seeing an increasing number of patients with chronic disease, patients who need wound care or basic care.
  • The U.S. government is making every effort to recover, identify and repatriate the remains of U.S. citizens who perished in the earthquake. An HHS Family Assistance Center (FAC) Team is working with the U.S. Department of State, the U.S. Department of Defense, and families of U.S. citizens to gather information that will help identify Americans who died so they may be reunited with their families and brought to their final resting place in the United States.
  • Public health experts from HHS Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) are participating on teams conducting rapid assessments of ongoing surveillance of health conditions in Haiti. Teams are creating snapshots of the current situation related to water safety, food supply, shelter conditions, and other health threats at over 50 sentinel surveillance sites. These data will be used to develop and prioritize immediate interventions. CDC experts have developed with international partners a public health surveillance instrument for ongoing assessments of types and numbers cases of disease, injury, and other health conditions. The surveillance is being piloted over the next week in hospitals and other health facilities across Haiti.
  • Approximately 18,964 American citizens have returned to the U.S. as of midnight Jan. 30. Of these, approximately 6,738 received Administration for Children and Families (ACF)-funded services assistance, such as medical attention, food, short-term lodging, transportation or logistics for their onward flights in the United States. These services were coordinated by the state emergency repatriation team.
  • Unaccompanied children coming from Haiti who have been matched with an adoptive family but who do not yet have legal guardians are placed in the custody of the Federal government, and are the responsibility of the Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR). As of Jan. 30 at 6:45 a.m., approximately 267 unaccompanied Haitian children have been put under the care of ORR. Of these, 179 were released to sponsors and 88 unaccompanied Haitian children are being cared for at ORR-designated facilities. Sponsors are typically prospective adoptive parents who had already begun the process to adopt the child.

January 29, 2010:

  • The HHS medical teams have reported seeing more than 18,500 patients so far, approximately 1,360 yesterday, Jan. 28.
  • Since they began seeing patients Jan 17, HHS medical teams have performed 63 surgeries and delivered 23 babies.
  • HHS currently has approximately 270 people deployed in Haiti to support relief efforts.
    • A Disaster Medical Assistance Team and the HHS International Medical Surgical Response Team continue to provide patient care using temporary medical stations set up in a soccer field near a GHESKIO clinic in Port-au-Prince.
    • Additional Disaster Medical Assistance Teams continue to provide primary care at Thebaud, at the U.S. embassy and at a Forward Operating Base in Petionville, as well as to assist with medical screening for passengers at the airport and triage patients flown aboard the Navy hospital ship USNS Comfort.
    • The teams are reporting a decrease in the number of patients with traumatic injuries, and an increasing number of patients with chronic disease, wound care or basic care.
  • Public health experts from HHS Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) are participating on teams conducting rapid assessments of ongoing surveillance of health conditions in Haiti. Teams are creating snapshots of the current situation related to water safety, food supply, shelter conditions, and other health threats at over 50 sentinel surveillance sites. These data will be used to develop and prioritize immediate interventions. CDC experts have developed with international partners a public health surveillance instrument for ongoing assessments of types and numbers cases of disease, injury, and other health conditions. The surveillance is being piloted over the next week in hospitals and other health facilities across Haiti.
  • Approximately 18,096 American citizens have returned to the U.S. as of midnight Jan. 29. Of these, approximately 6,609 received Administration for Children and Families (ACF)-funded services assistance, such as medical attention, food, short-term lodging, transportation or logistics for their onward flights in the United States. These services were coordinated by the state emergency repatriation team.
  • Children who are coming from Haiti who have been matched with an adoptive family but who do not yet have legal guardians are placed in the custody of the Federal government, and are the responsibility of the Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR). As of Jan. 29 at 9:00 a.m., approximately 200 unaccompanied Haitian children have been put under the care of ORR. Of these, 177 were released to sponsors and 23 unaccompanied Haitian children are being cared for at ORR-designated facilities. Sponsors are typically prospective adoptive parents who had already begun the process to adopt the child.

January 28, 2010:

  • The HHS medical teams have reported seeing more than 17,200 patients so far, approximately 1,870 yesterday, Jan. 27.
  • HHS currently has approximately 270 people deployed in Haiti to support relief efforts.
    • A Disaster Medical Assistance Team and the HHS International Medical Surgical Response Team continue to provide patient care using temporary medical stations set up in a soccer field near a GHESKIO clinic in Port-au-Prince.
    • Additional Disaster Medical Assistance Teams continue to provide primary care at Thebaud, at the U.S. embassy and at a Forward Operating Base in Petionville, as well as to assist with medical screening for passengers at the airport and triage patients flown aboard the Navy hospital ship USNS Comfort.
    • The teams are reporting a decrease in the number of patients with traumatic injuries, and an increasing number of patients with chronic disease, wound care or basic care.
  • Public health experts from HHS Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) are participating on teams conducting rapid assessments of and ongoing surveillance of health conditions in Haiti. Teams are creating snapshots of the current situation related to water safety, food supply, shelter conditions, and other health threats at over 50 sentinel surveillance sites. These data will be used to develop and prioritize immediate interventions. CDC experts have developed with international partners a public health surveillance instrument for ongoing assessments of types and numbers cases of disease, injury, and other health conditions. The surveillance is being piloted over the next week in hospitals and other health facilities across Haiti.
  • Approximately 16,897 American citizens have returned to the U.S. as of midnight Jan. 28. Of these, approximately 6,497 received Administration for Children and Families (ACF)-funded services assistance, such as medical attention, food, short-term lodging, transportation or logistics for their onward flights in the United States. These services were coordinated by the state emergency repatriation team.
  • Children who are coming from Haiti who have been matched with an adoptive family but who do not yet have legal guardians are placed in the custody of the Federal government, and are the responsibility of the Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR). As of Jan. 28 at 9:30 a.m., approximately 199 unaccompanied Haitian children have been put under the care of ORR. Of these, 173 were released to sponsors and 26 unaccompanied Haitian children are being cared for at ORR-designated facilities. Sponsors are typically prospective adoptive parents who had already begun the process to adopt the child.

 

January 27, 2010:

  • The HHS medical teams have reported seeing more than 15,500 patients so far, approximately 2,455 yesterday, Jan. 26. HHS has approximately 340 people deployed in Haiti to support relief efforts, although this number will return to approximately 275 when team rotations are complete this week.
  • HHS has approximately 340 people deployed in Haiti to support relief efforts, although this number will return to approximately 275 when team rotations are complete this week.
    • A Disaster Medical Assistance Team and the International Medical Surgical Response Team continue to provide patient care using temporary medical stations set up in a soccer field near a GHESKIO clinic in Port-au-Prince.
    • Additional teams are providing primary care at Thebaud, at the U.S. embassy and at a Forward Operating Base in Petionville, as well as to assist with medical screening for passengers at the airport and triage patients flown aboard the Navy hospital ship USNS Comfort.
    • Although the teams continue to treat traumatic injuries, they report seeing an increasing number of patients with chronic disease, and patients who need wound care or basic care.
  • Public health experts from HHS Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) are participating on teams conducting rapid assessments of conditions in Haiti. Information related to water safety, food supply, shelter conditions, and other health threats is being collected at 52 sentinel surveillance sites to develop and prioritize immediate interventions.
  • CDC experts are also working with USAID, US Incident Response Coordination Teams, Haitian Ministry of Health, and PAHO to develop public health surveillance instruments for ongoing assessments of types and numbers cases of disease, injury, and other health conditions. Once finalized, CDC will work with the government of Haiti and clinicians to collect data in 31 hospitals and other health facilities across Haiti.
  • Approximately 16,012 American citizens have returned to the U.S. as of midnight Jan. 27. Of these, approximately 6,319 received Administration for Children and Families (ACF)-funded services assistance, such as medical attention, food, short-term lodging, transportation or logistics for their onward flights in the United States. These services were coordinated by the state emergency repatriation team.
  • Children who are coming from Haiti who have been matched with an adoptive family but who do not yet have legal guardians are placed in the custody of the Federal government, and are the responsibility of the Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR). As of Jan. 27 at 1:00 a.m., approximately 199 unaccompanied Haitian children have been put under the care of ORR. Of these, 134 were released to sponsors. Sponsors are typically prospective adoptive parents who had already begun the process to adopt the child. An additional 62 unaccompanied Haitian children are being cared for at ORR-designated facilities and three more children are in the process of being released to their adoptive parents.

 

January 26, 2010:

  • A Haitian male, 31 years old, was found two blocks from the Port-au-Prince Cathedral on Rue de Miracle at approximately 3:30 p.m. Jan. 26 by soldiers from the 2nd Brigade, 325th Airborne Infantry Regiment of the 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division from Fort Bragg, N.C. He was buried in the rubble for 12 days. The man had a broken leg and severe dehydration. He was evacuated to a nearby U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Disaster Medical Assistance Team for treatment.
  • HHS missions include primary care in and around the U.S. Embassy, hospital decompression and surgical augmentation, and technical assistance in public health.
    • A Disaster Medical Assistance Team and the International Medical Surgical Response Team continue to provide patient care using temporary medical stations set up in a soccer field near a GHESKIO clinic in Port-au-Prince.
    • Additional teams are assigned to provide primary care at the U.S. embassy and at a Forward Operating Base in Petionville, as well as to assist with medical screening for passengers at the airport and triage patients flown aboard the Navy hospital ship USNS Comfort.
    • The teams have reported seeing more than 11,600 patients so far, including approximately 825 yesterday, Monday, Jan. 25.
  • Public health experts from the HHS Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are coordinating with the U.S. Agency for International Development, the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) in public health efforts to support the people of Haiti.
  • The initial efforts focused on joining with national and international partners to meet urgent public health needs, and establishing liaisons and coordination needed for successful, long-range public health programs in response to the earthquake.
  • CDC staff in Haiti are working with the Haitian Ministry of Health and PAHO to do public health assessments that are mapping current health threats in Haitian communities. The assessments focus on sanitation and water, shelter and health.
  • Approximately 14,185 American citizens have returned to the U.S. as of midnight Jan. 24. Of these, approximately 5,800 received Administration for Children and Families (ACF)-funded services assistance, such as medical attention, food, short-term lodging, transportation or logistics for their onward flights in the United States. These services were coordinated by the state emergency repatriation team.

 

January 25, 2010:

  • As part of its deployment process, HHS is rotating medical teams supporting efforts in Haiti, bringing in fresh teams and sending home the teams that have been providing care in Haiti. New teams from Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Missouri, Ohio and Florida are expected to arrive this week.
  • HHS missions include primary care in and around the U.S. Embassy, hospital decompression and surgical augmentation, triage for patients awaiting transport to USNS Comfort, and technical assistance in public health.
    • A Disaster Medical Assistance Team and the International Medical Surgical Response Team are providing patient care using temporary medical stations set up in a soccer field near a GHESKIO clinic in Port-au-Prince.
    • Additional teams are using a mobile clinic at a Forward Operating Base in Petionville, providing medical screening for passengers at the airport, and providing triage for patients flown aboard USNS Comfort.
    • The teams have reported seeing more than 10,700 patients so far, including approximately 1,245 yesterday, Sunday, Jan. 24. They have performed 42 surgeries and delivered nine babies since they began providing care Jan. 17.
  • HHS public health experts from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are providing technical assistance to the Haitian government to help determine public health needs of the impacted area and how to prevent food-borne and water-borne diseases as well as other diseases seen following disasters. The goal is to help alleviate and mitigate public health issues before they become medical issues. These personnel are working with the U.N. Health Cluster to help Haiti develop a long-term reconstruction plan to build a stronger public health system than that which existed before the earthquake. In addition, CDC personnel are collaborating with international partners and the Haitian government on communication messages for the Haitian people about safety and health.

 

January 24, 2010:

  • HHS medical teams have seen more than 9,500 patients since they began providing patient care in Haiti.
  • As of 12 a.m., Jan. 24, HHS teams had performed 36 surgeries.
  • HHS teams from around the U.S. are providing medical care at several locations in and around Port au Prince
    • A Disaster Medical Assistance Team and an HHS International Medical Surgical Response Team continue to provide patient care in a soccer field near a GHESKIO clinic in Port-au-Prince.
    • Additional teams continue to provide care in and around the U.S. embassy and at a Forward Operating Base established in Petionville.
    • The first HHS medical teams deployed in response to the earthquake in Haiti are returning to Georgia, California, New Jersey, Massachusetts, and Florida. Replacement teams are coming from Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Missouri, Ohio and other areas of Florida.
    • HHS is sending a team of medical professionals through the National Disaster Medical System to Homestead Air Reserve Base in Florida to assist with the medical needs of U.S. citizens as they return from Haiti.
  • More than 13,300 American citizens have returned to the U.S. from Haiti as of 12 a.m., Jan. 24 through various ports of entry in Maryland, New Jersey, and Florida. HHS Administration for Children and Families Office of Refugee Repatriation (ORR) assessed the travelers for immediate needs and provided over 5,200 with assistance, such as medical attention, food, short-term lodging, transportation or logistics for their onward flights in the United States.

 

January 23, 2010:

  • HHS medical teams have seen more than 8,000 patients since they began providing patient care in Haiti.
  • As of midnight, Jan. 22, HHS teams had performed 30 surgeries so far and delivered 8 babies.
  • HHS teams from around the U.S. are providing medical care at several locations in and around Port au Prince
    • A Disaster Medical Assistance Team and an HHS International Medical Surgical Response Team continue to provide patient care in a soccer field near a GHESKIO clinic in Port-au-Prince.
    • DMAT team continues to provide medical support to USNS Comfort by providing care to patients prior to transfer to the ship.
    • Additional teams are providing care in and around the U.S. embassy and at a Forward Operating Base established in Petionville.
  • HHS and CDC, along with WHO and Haitian Health Ministry, launched a pilot study assessing public health risks in over 30 sentinel sites around the capital city. The study will be expanded as rapid assessment surveys.
  • More than 12,000 American citizens have returned to the U.S. from Haiti as of 12 a.m., Jan. 23 through various ports of entry in Maryland, New Jersey, and Florida. HHS Administration for Children and Families Office of Refugee Repatriation (ORR) assessed the travelers for immediate needs and provided over 11,000 with assistance, such as medical attention, food, short-term lodging, transportation or logistics for their onward flights in the United States.

January 22, 2010:

  • HHS medical teams have seen more than 7,750 patients since they began providing patient care in Haiti.
  • The most common medical conditions being treated continue to be traumatic injuries and exacerbations of chronic disease. As of midnight, Jan. 21, HHS teams had performed 25 surgeries so far and delivered six babies.
  • HHS teams from around the U.S. are providing medical care at several locations in and around Port au Prince
    • A Disaster Medical Assistance Team and an HHS International Medical Surgical Response Team continue to provide patient care in a soccer field near a GHESKIO clinic in Port-au-Prince.
    • One of our Disaster Medical Assistance Teams is at a staging facility triaging patients to be flown by helicopter for treatment aboard Comfort.
    • Additional teams are providing care in and around the U.S. embassy and at a Forward Operating Base established in Petionville.
  • More than 8,600 American citizens have returned to the U.S. from Haiti as of January 21 at 9 a.m. EST through various ports of entry in Maryland, New Jersey, and Florida. HHS Administration for Children and Families Office of Refugee Repatriation (ORR) assessed the travelers for immediate needs and provided over 3,500 with assistance, such as medical attention, food, short-term lodging, transportation or logistics for their onward flights in the United States.

 

January 21, 2010:

  • Secretary Sebelius released a statement on efforts to unite Haitian children who recently arrived in Pittsburgh with prospective parents. Click here to read the statement.
  • HHS medical teams treated approximately 2,160 patients on Jan. 20. HHS medical teams have seen more than 7,260 patients since they began providing patient care in Haiti.
  • The most common medical conditions being treated are traumatic injuries and exacerbations of chronic disease. On Jan. 20, HHS medical teams performed ten surgeries and delivered three babies in the temporary medical station set up in a soccer field near the GHESKIO clinic in Port-au-Prince.
  • HHS teams from around the U.S. are providing medical care at several locations in and around Port au Prince
    • A Disaster Medical Assistance Team and an HHS International Medical Surgical Response Team are providing patient care in a soccer field near a GHESKIO clinic in Port-au-Prince.
    • One of our Disaster Medical Assistance Teams is at a staging facility triaging patients to be flown by helicopter for treatment aboard Comfort.
    • Additional teams are providing care in and around the U.S. embassy and at a Forward Operating Base established in Petionville.
  • More than 7,230 American citizens have returned to the U.S. from Haiti as of January 20 at 9 a.m. EST through various ports of entry in Maryland, New Jersey, and Florida. HHS Administration for Children and Families Office of Refugee Repatriation (ORR) assessed the travelers for immediate needs and provided almost 3,000 with assistance, such as medical attention, food, short-term lodging, transportation or logistics for their onward flights in the United States.

 

January 20, 2010:

  • HHS medical teams had treated more than 5,000 patients since they began providing patient care in Haiti.*
  • The most common medical conditions being treated are traumatic injuries and exacerbations of chronic disease.
  • HHS teams from around the U.S. are providing medical care at several locations in and around Port au Prince
    • A Disaster Medical Assistance Team (DMAT) and a surgical team from Massachusetts are providing medical care including surgeries at site near GHESKIO clinic
    • A DMAT from Florida is providing medical care at a clinic at the U.S. Embassy
    • A DMAT team from Georgia is providing triage medical support at Port Varreaux for patients who are being transported to Comfort
    • Medical teams from California and New Jersey are providing medical support at forward operating base Gray in Petionville – this is co-located with a food and water distribution site
  • More than 5,100 Americans returning from Haiti have been assisted so far.

*The number of patients HHS medical teams have assisted has been updated as reporting has improved. An additional 1,300 patients were seen on Jan. 19.

January 19, 2010:

U.S. Department of Health and Humans Services’ (HHS) medical response teams continue to provide medical care in Haiti at several locations, including at a soccer field near a GHESKIO clinic in Port-au-Prince and at the U.S. embassy. These teams are part of the international medical response led by the United Nations that are responding to request for assistance from the Haitian government.

Approximately 265 HHS medical personnel on the ground in Haiti. These doctors, nurses, paramedics, emergency medical technicians, and other health professionals are part of the National Disaster Medical System and the U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corps. These HHS medical teams came from around the U.S., including Georgia, California, New Jersey, Massachusetts, and Florida. HHS activated the National Disaster Medical System and the U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corps to assist in Haitian earthquake relief efforts.

Current HHS missions include hospital augmentation, care at the embassy, providing an assessment to assist the Haitian government with fatality management, and providing technical assistance in public health.

HHS response updates today include:

As of Monday, Jan. 18, HHS medical teams had treated over 1800 patients since they began providing patient care in Haiti.

  • The most common medical conditions being treated are traumatic injuries and exacerbations of chronic disease.
  • More than 4,500 Americans returning from Haiti have been assisted so far.

National Disaster Medical System Teams

Currently a Disaster Medical Assistance Team and the International Medical Surgical Response Team are providing patient care using temporary medical stations set up in a soccer field near a GHESKIO clinic in Port-au-Prince. Members of another Disaster Medical Assistance Team are providing care at the embassy.

More than 300 patients were seen Jan. 17 at a Haitian orphanage, most with acute medical problems. The teams reported treating more than 1,800 people as of Monday, including delivering a baby outside the embassy on Monday and performing surgery on a child aboard USS Carl Vinson on Sunday.

Personnel from a Disaster Mortuary Operations Response Team are assessing the situation on the ground to assist to assist the Haitian government with fatality management.

Public Health Service Commissioned Corps (PHS)

An HHS Incident Response Coordination Team is coordinating the HHS response on the ground to provide medical assistance for the people of Haiti at this critical time.

Public health experts from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are providing technical assistance to the Haitian government to help determine public health needs of the impacted area and how to prevent food-borne and water-borne diseases as well as other diseases seen following disasters.

Administration for Children and Families’ Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR)

ORR continues to receive, repatriate, and provide services to American citizens being flown to the United States military bases. After the planes land, the travelers are assessed for immediate needs, including medical attention, food, short-term lodging, transportation and logistics for their onward flight in the U.S. More than 4,500 Americans returning from Haiti have been assisted so far. ORR has also assisted in uniting Haitian orphans with adoptive U.S. parents.

 

     

    • This page last reviewed: June 30, 2010