Skip Ribbon Commands
Skip to main content
Skip over global navigation links
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Tranquil Terminus: Alternative Description for Time-Based Media

The following is a text alternative description for the Exercise: Tranquil Terminus video.

[Video begins with music and sound effects as the Department of Health and Human Services USA logo appears followed by the ASPR's logo and four pillars along with the caption "Saving Lives. Protecting Americans". Photos and brief statements about the Tranquil Terminus Exercises are made by individuals at the Spokane, Boise, and Los Angeles patient debarkation locations.]

Exercise: Tranquil Terminus, Spokane: Patient Debarkation Location - Bob Lutz, Spokane Regional Health District:  The exercise is called Tranquil Terminus.

Exercise: Tranquil Terminus, Boise: Patient Embarkation Location - Angie Heinzman, Air St. Luke’s – Treasure Valley: We have 4 patients who have tested positive for Ebola.

Exercise: Tranquil Terminus, Spokane: Patient Debarkation Location - Bob Lutz, Spokane Regional Health District: It’s a neat opportunity to both prepare and practice for any kind of possible contagion.

Exercise: Tranquil Terminus, Boise: Patient Embarkation Location - Angie Heinzman, Air St. Luke’s – Treasure Valley: Two patients will be received in Spokane, Washington and two in Los Angeles, where they’ll be going to their treatment facilities.

Exercise: Tranquil Terminus, Spokane: Patient Debarkation Location - Bob Lutz, Spokane Regional Health District: You know, you’re looking at probably 50 different organizations that came together to make this exercise happen.

Exercise: Tranquil Terminus, Los Angeles: Patient Debarkation Location - Stella Fogleman, Los Angeles County Department of Public Health: To be able to have this opportunity to welcome the patients here, have our responders meet them and work collaboratively to get the patients safely to care at the regional Ebola treatment center.  It’s extremely important that we do that. 

[In next segment, a United States map is shown captioned “Tranquil Terminus Key Facts”.  Highlighted in various colors, the key facts are listed as:

  • 4 Regions
  • 7 States
  • 7 Ebola Patients
  • 5 Originating Medical Facilities
  • 5 Regional Ebola Treatment Centers
  • 26 State/Local Health Organizations
  • 11 Federal Government Organizations

The U.S. map reappears unmarked titled, “Participating Airports”. As the animation begins, the locations of the airports are marked on the map and listed as:

  • Boise Airport (BOI) – Boise, ID
  • Cartersville Airport (VPC) – Cartersville, GA
  • Charleston International Airport (CHS) – Charleston, SC
  • DeKalb–Peachtree Airport (PDK) – Atlanta, GA
  • Ellington Field Airport (EFD) – Houston, TX
  • Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport (ATL) – Atlanta, GA
  • Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) – Los Angeles, CA
  • Spokane International Airport (GEG) – Spokane, WA
  • Will Rogers World Airport (OKC) – Oklahoma City, OK

The video zoom in on the Spokane, WA; Boise, ID; and Los Angeles, CA patient debarkation locations on the map. These locations will be featured during the video. The map disappears and video footage of the Boise International airport is shown with the caption, “Idaho: Boise International Airport (BOI). Four highly infectious disease (HID) patients embarking.  Confirmed virus: Ebola.” and that of a Kalitta Air aircraft arriving at an aircraft hangar captioned, “747 with containerized bio-containment system (CBCS).” Ambulances equipped to transport patients with infectious disease approach with EMT personnel wearing protective clothing.  Narratives from various individuals continues.]

Caption John Smart, MPH, Regional Emergency Coordinator, HHS Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response: This is a patient movement capability that allows us to more patients with highly infectious disease from a rural area to a hospital that can provide services for the disease that they have.

Vance Ferebee, RN Air Mission Exercise Safety Officer – Pheonix Air Group:  Since we have two that are ambulatory, they’ll be faster, so you can go ahead and hit the two ambulatory and get them up.

Lisa Spanberger, MPH Disaster Preparedness Manager, St. Lukes Health System - In this situation, the patient’s signs and symptoms matched with their previous travel history to the region that was having a current Ebola outbreak, and given those signs and symptoms, we quickly isolated the patients, were able to activate our Ebola protocols within the facility, and start the process of getting them transported to the treatment facility.

Raquel Hansen, System Clinical Educator, St. Luke’s Health System - We transported them in an isopod and for exercise play, we’ll take him out of the isopod and put him on the aircraft.

[The multiple images of the Containerized Bio-Containment System is shown and captioned "Containerized Bio-Containment System". A short explanation about this portion of the exercise is given by the Controller of the Exercise Support Team.]

Dawn Thomas, Controller, Exercise Support Team - About 15 minutes in I’m going to put an inject in, that one of the patients goes from dry to wet.

[The Ebola Stages are shown as Ebola Stages – Stage 1: influenza-like illness; Stage 2: multisystem features, including “wet” gastrointestinal symptoms (vomiting diarrhea); Stage 3: internal and external bleeding, multiorgan failure. As the video continues, a patient is shown undergoing medical procedures with the caption “Flight time: +15:00, Exercise Inject Activated”.  The live footage transitions back to the animated U.S. map showing the plane moving from Boise, ID to Spokane, WA location. The live video footage resume to show an patient transport aircraft landing at the airport for the next exercise with the caption “Spokane: Spokane International Airport (GEG) 2 highly infectious disease (HID) patients debarking. Confirmed virus: Ebola. One patient turned wet in-flight”. On board the plane, the Medical transport team prepares for patient disbarkment while ground medical transport teams are waiting. The patient is removed from the plane with the caption “Patient Destination: Regional Ebola Treatment Center, Providence Sacred Heart Medical Center and Children’s Hospital, Spokane, WA. Video footage shows the inside of an ambulance covered in plastic with the caption “Patient Destination: Regional Ebola Treatment Center Providence Sacred Heart Medical Center and Children’s Hospital, Spokane, WA. More narratives are given explaining the Tranquil Terminus exercise at this location.]

Tammie Drapeau, Clinical Manager, American Medical Response - We actually have a special ambulance that we use.  The ambulance is wrapped in plastic, and the only thing that ambulance is used for is special pathogens patients like you’re seeing here today.  Those are patients that have come in contact with some highly disease of any type, not just Ebola, but that is what we typically practice.

David Csernak, MS, Field Project Officer, HHS Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response - The challenge of this exercise is that every patient we’re moving is highly infectious. One of our goals is to ensure the safety of not only the providers, but of the general public throughout the entire patient movement process.

[Music with full sound effects continue as the animated plane moves across the U.S. map to its next destination captioned “Los Angeles: Los Angeles International Airport (LAX). Two highly infectious disease (HID) patients debarking.” Medical transport teams dressed in protective clothing approach the plane and removes the patient from the aircraft with the caption “Patient Destination: Regional Ebola Treatment Center Cedars Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA”.]

Stella Fogleman, MPH Director Emergency Preparedness & Response System, Los Angeles County Department of Public Health - They have landed at LAX and then they were transported to the regional infectious disease treatment center, and that’s at Cedars Sinai Medical Center, and I know they’re on to Cedars Sinai and we’re waiting for the announcement that they have arrived safely.

Terry Krammer, BSN HPP Manager & Chief – Disaster Services, Los Angeles County EMS Agency – [Krammer is talking on his mobile phone to an unknown party] Patient #2 is offloaded and in Cedar’s care?  All right.  Well, congratulations; thanks for the phone call.  All right, so we’re going to consider this END EX.

[The video changes to non-descript background with narrative interviews of Matthew Dudley, Bob Lutz and Stella Fogleman followed by an image of the Tranquil Terminus logo surrounded by the logos of supporting local and federal government agencies, hospitals, and airports.]

Matthew Dudley, Idaho Department of Health & Welfare – For these high risk events, it’s important that we get these opportunities to practice, because the day it happens, we need to be prepared.

Bob Lutz, Spokane Regional Health District – We don’t know if a disease is going to present itself in our community.

Stella Fogleman, Los Angeles County Department of Public Health – I believe we are more prepared today than we were yesterday, and with the lessons learned, and building those into our plans, we’ll be even more prepared tomorrow.

[The video concludes with the caption “Exercise: Tranquil Terminus” on a non-descript background followed by the Department of Health and Human Services logo and caption, “Produced at U.S. taxpayer expense” along with an audio voiceover, “Produced at U.S. taxpayer expense at the Department of Health and Human Services”.]

Watch, Liste​n, Subscribe

 
Facebook Exit Icon Twitter Exit Icon YouTube Exit Icon
Email via GovDelivery Exit Icon LinkedIn Exit Icon
  • This page last reviewed: August 06, 2018